The Harry Suffrin Shop


Published:

1947

In downtown Detroit during the ’40s, dapper gentlemen had an embarrassment of wardrobe riches to choose from. Emporiums catering to well-dressed males included Whaling’s, J.M Citron, S.L. Bird & Sons, Hughes & Hatcher, Kilgore and Hurd, Scholnick’s, Capper & Capper, and Harry Suffrin — in addition to the department stores. The expansive Harry Suffrin shop, on Shelby Street, is shown here on a well-trafficked day. The store was founded in 1922 and became famous for customer service, which included free alterations. In the late 1950s, Harry Suffrin merged with Hughes & Hatcher to become Hughes-Hatcher-Suffrin, identifiable by its signature logo script. Locations sprang up all over metro Detroit, but the company eventually went out of business in the 1980s.

Edit Module
Edit Module Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Content

Making a Movement

Paxahau celebrates a decade of keeping Detroit’s Movement electronic music festival running.

Pet Project

Catfé Lounge is part yoga studio, part living room, and part adoption center

An Hour With... Marlowe Stoudamire

We speak to the Detroit 67 Project Director

The Way It Was

When the flames arose on the afternoon of April 27, 1915, suspicions grew in some quarters

Classical Rock

DSO to honor David Bowie with symphonic covers concert
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Most Popular

  1. A Ginger Tale
    Its factories are long gone, but 150-year-old Vernors is still ‘Detroit’s drink’
  2. Roadhouse Roots
    Karl’s Cabin is taking American comfort food to new heights
  3. Cream of the Crop
    We tried a bunch of cool locally made ice cream — here’s the scoop
  4. Fun by the Ounce
    Sweeties candy and ice cream shop is a joyful addition to Kercheval Avenue shopping
  5. Real Estate All-Stars 2016
  6. Bring Home the Beacon
    The Round Island Lighthouse, a National Register of Historic Places site, stands as a symbol of...
  7. Scenes from the Showcase
    Michigan wineries gather in the ‘D’ for annual event
  8. Fresh Look
  9. Too Many Cooks
    Committee-made wines maximize volume and profit — not flavor