The Harry Suffrin Shop


Published:

1947

In downtown Detroit during the ’40s, dapper gentlemen had an embarrassment of wardrobe riches to choose from. Emporiums catering to well-dressed males included Whaling’s, J.M Citron, S.L. Bird & Sons, Hughes & Hatcher, Kilgore and Hurd, Scholnick’s, Capper & Capper, and Harry Suffrin — in addition to the department stores. The expansive Harry Suffrin shop, on Shelby Street, is shown here on a well-trafficked day. The store was founded in 1922 and became famous for customer service, which included free alterations. In the late 1950s, Harry Suffrin merged with Hughes & Hatcher to become Hughes-Hatcher-Suffrin, identifiable by its signature logo script. Locations sprang up all over metro Detroit, but the company eventually went out of business in the 1980s.

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