Arts & Entertainment Listings

April Events



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Art

 

 

The Anton Art Center

Macomb Community College Workforce and Continuing Education Show. April 21-May 11. Portrait Show. April 26-May 23.

125 Macomb Place, Mount Clemens; 586-469-8666; theartcenter.org.

 

Artcite

Through sculptures constructed with soft, playful materials, Mona Sharma’s work in the exhibit The Loss and Reclamation of Faith confronts the human penchant for unwavering faith. Through April 20.

109 University Ave. W., Windsor; 519-977-6564; artcite.ca.

 

Artspace II

The expressive self-portraits of artist Thomas Humes will be displayed in his handcrafted reclaimed-wood frames. April 2-30.

303 E. Maple, Birmingham; 248-258-1540; artspace2.com/artspace2.

 

Cranbrook Art Museum

The work of emerging designers, architects, and artists will be on display for the 2013 Graduate Degree Exhibition. April 21-May 12. $8 adults, $6 seniors 65+, $4 students, free for children 12 and under.

39221 Woodward, Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-3300; cranbrookart.edu/museum.

 

Photograph Courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels.

Detroit Institute of Arts

Iranian American artist Shirin Neshat will confront the complexities of identity, gender, and power through eight video installations and two series of art photography. Public programs and an illustrated catalog will accompany the exhibit. April 7-July 7.

No admission fee for residents of Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties. Others: $8 adults; $6 seniors; $4 youth 6-17; under 5 free. (Special exhibit fees may apply for all.) 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thu.; 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun.; closed Mon.

5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org.

 

Elaine L. Jacob Gallery

The Wayne State University gallery presents the challenging and thought-provoking exhibit Hypertension. April 26-July 19.

480 W. Hancock, Detroit; 313-993-7813; art.wayne.edu/jacob_gallery.

 

Flint Institute of Arts

Through 50 paintings, created between 1828 and 1945, Reflection on Water in American Painting: The Phelan Collection travels through the maritime and seaside history of America, capturing every aspect of life on or in the water. Free admission, special exhibits range from $5-$7. April 6-16.

1120 E. Kearsley St., Flint; 810-234-1695; flintarts.org.

 

The Gallery Project:

Circus investigates the history, politics, and aesthetics of circuses and their performers. March 28-May 4.

215 E. Fourth St., Ann Arbor; 734-997-7012; thegalleryproject.com.

 

Lawrence Street Gallery:

Exposures: Photography ’13 is a juried competition that runs throughout April.

22620 Woodward Ave., Suite A, Ferndale; 248-544-0394; lawrencestreetgallery.com.

 

Toledo Museum of Art:

For the first time in the region, a collection of works by indigenous Australians will be exhibited in Crossing Cultures: The Owen and Wagner Collection of Contemporary Aboriginal Australian Art from the Hood Museum of Art. April 12-July 14. Free admission. (Some special exhibits require purchased tickets.)

10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thu.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.; noon-6 p.m. Sun.

2445 Monroe, Toledo; 419-255-8000; toledomuseum.org.

 

University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA):

Thangkas, portable religious paintings on cloth, along with an array of religious murals, sculptures, and other portable objects will be on display to showcase the rich iconography of Buddha and Buddhist deities. Through June 9.

Admission is free, donations accepted. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. 12-5 p.m. Sun.

525 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-764-0395; umma.umich.edu.

 

 


Classical

 

 

Chamber Music Society of Detroit

• The Toronto-based Gryphon Trio, known for its big and bold performances, will perform works by Haydn, Chan Ka Nin, Christos Hatzis, and Mendelssohn. 8 p.m. April 6.

• Twenty-one-year-old award-winning Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov will perform works by Scriabin, Liszt, and Chopin. 8 p.m. April 13. $15-$60.

Seligman Performing Arts Center, 22305 W. 13 Mile Rd., Beverly Hills; 248-855-6070;  chambermusicdetroit.org.

 

Chamber Music at the Scarab Club

In a springtime concert, mezzo soprano Barbara Bland will be accompanied by a sextet of flute, cello, viola, violin, piano, and harp, performing works such as Au Clair de la Lune, by Jacques de la Presle, the rarely performed Ennanga, by William Grant Still, and other works by d’Indy and Bach. 4 p.m. April 14. $18-$18-$22.

Grosse Pointe Unitarian Church, 17150 Maumee Ave., Grosse Pointe; 248-474-8930; scarabclub.org/chambermusic.

 

Detroit Chamber Winds & Strings

• The Robert Hurst Ensemble, led by jazz bassist and The Tonight Show band member Robert Hurst, performs. 8 p.m. April 5. $10-$22.

Hagopian World of Rugs, 850 S. Old Woodward Ave., Birmingham. detroitchamberwinds.org.

 

• Combining classical music with storytelling, Musical Tales is a concert for both children and adults. Three children’s fables will be presented in the first half, followed by music-related activities for the kids while the adults enjoy more music in the second half. 3 p.m. April 14. $10-$25.

Birmingham Unitarian Church, 38651 Woodward Ave., Birmingham. detroitchamberwinds.org.

 

• In a unique Detroit setting, cellist Debra Fayroian and pianist Luis Resto will combine classical and jazz music. 3 p.m. April 28. $10-$35.

Eastern Market. 2934 Russell St., Detroit.; 248-559-2095; detroitchamberwinds.org.

 

Detroit Symphony Orchestra

• Violinist Karen Gomyo, conducted by Andrew Grams, will perform pieces by Bach and Britten, as well as Mozart’s Symphony No. 41, Jupiter. 8 p.m. April 6.

• Accompanied by the University Musical Society, cellist Lynn Harrell will perform pieces by Mozart, Dvorak, and Ives. 10:45 a.m. April 26. 3 p.m. April 28. $15-$100.

Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-576-5111; dso.org.

 

Wayne State University

•The Campus Band and Concert Band, conducted by Janet McCaskill and Douglas Bianchi, perform. 7:30 p.m. April 3. $5-$8.

Community Arts Auditorium 5451 Cass Ave., Detroit; 313-577-1795; dso.org.
 

• Mondays at the Max with Wayne State Choral Showcase, conducted by Norah Duncan IV, Scott Hanioan, and Ann Marie Koukios. 7:30 p.m. April 8.

• Mondays at the Max with Wayne State University Orchestra conducted by Kypros Markou. 7:30 p.m. April 22. $15.

Max M. Fisher Music Center, 3711 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-576-5100; dso.org.

 

University Musical Society

The Takács Quartet combines four distinct musical personalities to bring audiences a unique blend of warmth, drama, and humor. The ensemble is returning for its 16th area performance since 1984, with works by Haydn, Britten, and Beethoven. 8 p.m. April 12. $24-$50.

Rackham Auditorium, 915 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538; ums.org.

 

 

Dance

 

 

Photograph by Gabi Stone, processing by Danielle Vivio.

Michigan Classic Ballet Company

The Michigan Classic Ballet Company will perform a stunning retelling of Snow White. The classic Brothers Grimm fairytale about a kindhearted princess, her friends, and their encounters with an evil queen features original choreography by Attila Mosolygo, artistic director of the Grand Rapids Ballet Junior Company. 1 p.m. & 5 p.m. Apr. 20. $18-$22.

Mercury Auditorium, 29300 W. 11 Mile Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-334-1300, michiganclassicballet.org.

 

Ragamala Dance

In Sacred Earth, the philosophy and myth of Indian traditions are brought to you in “ecstatic” and “contemplative” flavor by choreographers Ranee and Aparna Ramaswamy. Live music articulates the exploration of human-landscape interconnectedness, through a score that’s meditative and thrilling. 7:30 p.m. April 24. $22-$44.

Power Center, 121 Fletcher Street, Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538, ums.org.

 

 

Events

 

 

Photograph by Jerry Metellus.

Mike Tyson

For one night only, legendary boxer and now Broadway veteran Mike Tyson will bring his one-man show to Detroit. In Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth, audiences will get a personal look into heavyweight’s life. April 6. $45-$300.

Fox Theatre. 2211 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-471-6611; olympiaentertainment.com.

 

Cruise Thru the Decades — A Fashion Show

This fundraiser looks at fashion’s journey through the decades, telling the story from the dawn of automobiles in the late 1800s and Christopher Columbus Smith’s first boat. There will be shopping before and after the show at the Detroit Yacht Club, featuring specialty vintage shops, jewelry artisans, and boutiques. Luncheon will be provided. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Apr. 6. $45.

Detroit Yacht Club, 1 Riverbank Drive (Belle Isle), Detroit; 313-824-1200, dyc.com.

 

Novi Home and Garden Show

In need of inspiration for that project you’ve been neglecting at home? You can likely find it at the Novi Home and Garden Show, which features everything you’ll need, as well as an arts-and-crafts area. 2 p.m.–9 p.m. Apr. 5; 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Apr. 6; 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Apr. 7. $8 adults; $7 seniors (60+); children 12/under free. $5 parking fee.

Suburban Collection Showplace, 46100 Grand River, Novi; 248-737-4477, novihomeshow.com.

 

FestiFools

It is the “Festifools Creed” to bring together students and community volunteers to create public art that’s unique and free to everyone. Larger-than-life papier-mâché creatures will take over Main Street, as will the Stomp-like music, performed by the U-M student group Groove. Wear your own creative mask, join in the festivities, and get your “fool” on. 4 p.m.–5 p.m. Apr. 7.

Downtown Ann Arbor, Main Street, Ann Arbor; 734-763-7550, festifools.org.

 

ArtXDetroit

Nearly 40 local Kresge Arts Fellows and Eminent Artist awardees will showcase a range of artwork including dance, musical, and theatrical performances; literary readings; and visual arts exhibitions for Art X Detroit, a biennial event presented in partnership by Midtown Detroit Inc. and the Kresge Foundation. The event will take place throughout Midtown’s cultural center, at more than a dozen venues including the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, the Detroit Institute of the Arts, and the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. The free, five-day event will also include workshops, panel discussions and public art displays, with special presentations by writer Bill Harris and poet Naomi Long Madgett, both recipients of the Kresge Foundation’s Eminent Artist award. April 10-14.

Info: ArtXDetroit.com.

 

Great Lakes Art Fair

Rain or shine, the art fair will go on. The Great Lakes Art Fair is one of the largest indoor art events in Michigan. The bi-annual event showcases fine artists in the region. 1 p.m.–8 p.m. Apr. 12; 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Apr. 13; 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Apr. 14. $7 adults.; children 12/under free. Hall A.

Suburban Collection Showplace, 46100 Grand River, Novi; 248-348-5600, greatlakesartfair.com.

 

Hellenic Museum of Michigan Grand Opening

Let’s face it: Without Detroit’s Greektown, our city would be much less of a magical place. That said, Detroit’s Greek heritage is one to celebrate, which is precisely the mission behind the Hellenic Museum of Michigan. It honors the brave Greek immigrants that settled in Michigan over 100 years ago. The Museum’s grand opening will kick off a weekend-long celebration of history, remembrance, and culture in Detroit, like the Greek Independence Day Parade. It will feature a dedication ceremony presided by His Eminence Metropolitan Nicholas, of the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Detroit, as well as Museum President Ernest Zachary. April 13. 5 p.m.

Hellenic Museum of Michigan, 67 E. Kirby, Detroit; 313-871-4100, hellenicmi.org.

 

VegMichigan

It’s not just about eating salads. There are immense environmental, health, and ethical benefits from plant-based diets. At the region’s premier vegan tastefest and expo, leading national and local speakers will cover these topics. Samples of tasty vegan cuisine from local restaurants and take-home resources will also be provided. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Apr. 21. $10 at the door. $7 pre-paid. Free for Veg Michigan Members and children 5/under. $5 parking fee. Hall C and Diamond Center.

Suburban Collection Showplace, 46100 Grand River, Novi; 877-778-3464, vegmichigan.org.

 

MI Earth Day Fest

The Michigan Green Team hosts Rochester’s fifth MI Earth Day Fest after a three-year hiatus. The event is a three-day celebration of green- and healthy-living products, services, and programs sponsored by local community groups and businesses. With 150-plus exhibits, 20-plus presentations, as well as entertainment, concessions, kids activities, and awards from the U.S. Green Building Council, the fest is “one of the planet’s largest Earth Day celebrations,” according to the MGT. All proceeds will be donated to local “green” programs. Apr. 26-28.

MI Earth Day Fest, Third & Water Streets, Rochester; 248-808-3601, miedf.org.

 

Novi Metro Detroit Spring Classic Car Auction

Hundreds of classic cars, antique trucks, and special-interest vehicles will be available for car enthusiasts to bid on, as well as automotive memorabilia and toy car collectibles. Apr. 26-28. $10 per day. $15 weekend pass. $5 parking fee. Halls B & C.

Suburban Collection Showplace, 46100 Grand River, Novi; 866-653-8900, classicmotorcarauctions.com.
 


Film

 

 

Michigan Theater

• Watch the final battle for Middle-Earth in The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. 7 p.m. April 1. $7.50-$10.

• High-school classmates reunite after 25 years and relive their memories of the ’80s in Sunny. 2 p.m. April 6. Free.

• When a king collapses, his body-double must pull off the biggest scam of his career to save their country in Masquerade. 2 p.m. April 6. Free.

• Gus Van Sant wrote and directed Last Days, inspired by the life of Kurt Cobain. 7 p.m. April 8. $7-$10.

• In The Last Mimzy, a brother and sister discover a box of high-tech artifacts masquerading as toys and soon discover that they’re responsible for saving the world. 7 p.m. April 15. $7-$10.

Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-668-8463; michigantheater.org.

 

photograph courtesy Redford Theatre

Redford Theatre

The Three Stooges festival features six of the Stooges’ best work. Watch Larry, Moe, and Curly at 8 p.m. April 5; 2 p.m. & 8 p.m. April 6. $5.

• Paul Newman and Robert Redford star as Wild West outlaws in search of a more successful criminal career in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. 8 p.m. April 19; 2 p.m. & 8 p.m. April 20. $4.

• Buster Keaton was known for his silent films, physical comedy, and deadpan expression. See why he earned the nickname “The Great Stone Face” during the Buster Keaton festival, featuring his films Electric House, Playhouse, The Scarecrow, and The Goat. 8 p.m. April 27. $8-$12.

17360 Lahser, Detroit; 313-537-2560; redfordtheatre.com.

 

State Theatre

The Crow stars Brandon Lee as a rock musician who is murdered by a group of thugs. One year later, a crow appears at his grave to raise him from the dead. The film, which takes place in Detroit, has become infamous because Lee was accidently shot during filming and died 12 hours later. Midnight. April 6. $7.

Beavis and Butt-Head Do America follows two obnoxious teens who are on a mission to get another television after theirs disappears. Midnight. April 20. $7.

• The first film adaption of Freaky Friday follows a mother and daughter who make a wish to trade places. Their wish comes true, and the two are left to navigate each other’s complicated lives. 1:30 p.m. April 21. Free for children 12 and under. $7.50-$10.

233 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-8667; michtheater.org/state.

 

Detroit Film Theatre

• An intense family drama turns into a legal thriller when Simin obtains a visa to leave Iran for the U.S., where he hopes to make a better future for his 11-year-old daughter. But his wife doesn’t want to leave her sick father in The Separation. 7 p.m. April 4. $5.

Women Without Men interweaves stories of four Iranian women and their relationships during a time of political turmoil in 1953 Iran. 7 p.m. April 5. $5.

Black Orpheus brings the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus to the madness of Carnival. 3 p.m. April 6. $5.

• Weird connections ensue after two women become friends in the groundbreaking 1974 film, Celine and Julie Go Boating. 7 p.m. April 6; 1 p.m. April 7. $7.50.

Close-Up uses a real-life event, the arrest of a man who impersonated a famous filmmaker, to investigate movies, identity, and existence. 7 p.m. April 11. $5.

Nicky’s Family tells the story of Nicholas Winton, a man who organized the rescue of 669 Czech and Slovak children before World War II. 7 p.m., 9:30 p.m. April 19; 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., April 20; 2 p.m. & 4:30 p.m. April 21. $7.50.

• Take a look at the 1964 Harlem ghetto, filled with drugs, violence, and deep despair, in The Cool World. 3 p.m. April 20. $5.

• The 1971 film Max Et Les Ferrailleurs wasn’t released in the United States until 2012. This crime drama follows a Paris detective who is out for justice after watching too many criminals slip through his fingers. 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. April 26 & 27; 2 p.m. & 4:30 p.m. April 28. $7.50.

• A knight, recently returned from the Crusades, challenges death to a game of chess in hopes of extending his life in The Seventh Seal. 4 p.m. April 27. $5.

Detroit Institute of Arts; 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org.
 
 
 

Museums

 

 

Arab American National Museum

Arab Civilization: Our Heritage features Arab contributions to the early world. Ongoing in the Community Courtyard.

Coming to America focuses on Arab immigrants and the culture they brought to the United States. Ongoing in Gallery 1.

Living in America exhibits early Arab-American life. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 2.

Making an Impact celebrates the stories of Arab-American athletes, organizations, physicians, labor leaders, and entertainers. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 3.

$6 adults; $3 students and seniors; children under 5 free.

13624 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-2266; arabamericanmuseum.org.

 

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

Celebrating a Century of Sisterhood, Scholarship and Service 1913-2013 is a curated image display, reminiscing in the historical, cultural, and educational icons of the Delta Sisterhood’s past 100 years of community service. The yearlong exhibit opens on at 4:30 p.m. on April 1 and will run every seven days.

And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture is an evolving exhibit that recounts the 3.5-million-year-old odyssey that begins in Africa and ends in Detroit. Ongoing in the Core Exhibition Gallery.

• A collective sculptural show, Visions of Our 44th President, features 44 3-dimensional interpretations of President Obama. Through Aug. 4.

Inspiring Minds: African Americans in Science and Technology is a new permanent exhibit highlighting African American contributions to the four disciplines of scientific advancement since the 17th century.

Stories in Stained Glass: The Art of Samuel A. Hodge, a series of colorful works focusing on three areas of African-American culture and history — musicians, dancers, and freedom advocates — is one of the ongoing exhibits in the Main Level Corridor.

A Is for Africa includes 26 interactive stations making up a 3-D “dictionary” designed for children. Ongoing in the Lower Level Corridor.

Ring of Genealogy, a work designed by local artist Hubert Massey, depicts the struggles of African-Americans in the United States.

$8 adults. $5 seniors (62+). $5 youth (3-12). Free for children under 3.

315 E. Warren, Detroit; 313-494-5800; thewright.org.

 

Cranbrook Institute of Science

• Help the museum save an 18th century cannon April 1-5. Patrons will help to gently remove soot and grime off of the two-century-old artifact with brushes, as part of the Extreme Deep and Dive Deep exhibitions, which explore life and artifacts “at the depth’s of the Earth’s waters.”

• Ongoing exhibits are The Story of Us, a nationally regarded anthropology collection; People of the Woodlands: Objects of Great Lakes Native America, a review of objects, practices, and the environment of Great Lakes native peoples and their complex connection; and Astronomy Lobby, a self-updating display from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

$12.50 adults. $9.50 children (2-12) and seniors (65+).

39221 Woodward Ave, Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-3200, science.cranbrook.edu.

 

Detroit Historical Museum

• New permanent exhibits include Doorway to Freedom: Detroit & the Underground Railroad, which explores Detroit’s role as the “doorway to freedom” in fugitive slaves’ quest to find freedom in the North.

The Allesee Gallery of Culture highlights the people, places, and events that influence our understanding of modern Detroit.

Detroit: Arsenal of Democracy documents the contributions Detroit’s industrial infrastructure made in World War II and also explores how the war changed the city.

• Robert Scherer and Henry Ford are just a few inventors featured in The Gallery of Innovation, an exhibit featuring Detroit innovators and the products they created that we still use today.

5401 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-1805; detroithistorical.org.

 

Dossin Great Lakes Museum

The museum, now closed for renovations, is scheduled to reopen in May.

100 Strand, Belle Isle, Detroit; 313-833-1805; detroithistorical.org/main/dossin.

 

Exhibit Museum of Natural History

RACE: Are We So Different? is a national traveling exhibit exploring the similarities among different nationalities. Through May 27.

Archeology! Current Research in the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology is an ongoing research exhibit that examines questions that contemporary archeologists ask about the past and the techniques they use to answer them.

• Permanent exhibits are The Hall of Evolution, The Michigan Wildlife Gallery, The Anthropology Displays, and The Geology Displays. Free admission; suggested donation is $6.

University of Michigan, 1109 Geddes, Ann Arbor; 734-764-0478; lsa.umich.edu/exhibitmuseum.

 

Greenfield Village

The Village is closed for the winter season and will reopen April 13.

20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001; hfmgv.org/village.

 

Henry Ford Museum

Driving America includes more than 100 vehicles, authentic artifacts, digital media, interactive play, and personal accounts that focus on the influence the automobile has had on American culture.

Heroes of the Sky is a permanent exhibit focusing on adventures in early aviation.

With Liberty and Justice for All chronicles America’s journeys to freedom, beginning with the American Revolution and ending with the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.

• Also: Dymaxion House, Presidential Limousines, Made in America, and Rosa Parks Bus. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Thu; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri.-Sun. $17 adults; $15 seniors (62+); $12.50 youth; children 4/under free.

20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001; thehenryford.org.

 

Holocaust Memorial Center

Exhibits are dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust. Learn about World War II, Jewish culture and religious beliefs, the postwar world, heroic rescues, and more. The center also houses a multilingual library. $5-$8 admission.

28123 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-553-2400; holocaustcenter.org.

 

Michigan Science Center

Bodies: Human Anatomy in Motion examines the effects of health and lifestyle choices on the inner workings of the human body. Through May 26. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wed.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Thu.-Fri.; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat.; 12-6 p.m. Sun. $12.95 adults; $9.95 seniors and youth; children under 2 free. 

5020 John R St., Detroit; 313-577-8400; michigansciencecenter.org.

 

Motown Museum

• Guided tours of the museum include The Gallery, which is composed of original stage uniforms worn by famous Motown artists, sheet music, rare photos, and other memorabilia.

Studio A, where Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross & the Supremes, and other Motown artists recorded still contains the original instruments and equipment used during Detroit’s Motown era.

• Other attractions include Berry Gordy’s Apartment, The Echo Chamber, and Motown Style, which is home to the jeweled white glove made famous by Michael Jackson.

2648 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-875-2264; motownmuseum.com.

 

Plymouth Historical Museum

Walk down the museum’s “Main Street” and enjoy the new special exhibit, Made in America, highlighting America’s contributions to industry, with emphasis on Michigan-made products. Through June 9. 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Wed., Fri., Sat., & Sun. $5 adults; $2 children.

155 S. Main Street, Plymouth; 734-455-8940, plymouthhistory.org.

 

 


Music

 

 

Sigur Rós

This ambient rock band from Iceland is known for its incorporation of classical and minimalist elements. Although “sigur” means “victory” and “rós” means “rose” in Icelandic, the two words aren’t grammatically correct when put together. The band is actually named after the lead singer’s sister, who was born the same day they formed in 1994. The band writes their lyrics in Vonlenska, a non-literal language that forms unintelligible words. Vonlenska focuses on the sounds of language but lacks grammar and meaning. The band describes it as “a form of gibberish vocals that fits to the music.” 7:30 p.m. April 1. $51+.

Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-983-6000.

 

Andrew McMahon

Andrew McMahon performed under the name Jack’s Mannequin until 2012, when he started using his real name. He began his career as the lead singer for Something Corporate. In 2005, after a relentless case of laryngitis caused him to cancel all his upcoming shows, McMahon was diagnosed with leukemia. After numerous treatments and a stem-cell transplant from his sister, McMahon began performing again. A documentary of his battle with leukemia was released in 2009. He founded a nonprofit charity, the Dear Jack Foundation, to help raise funds for cancer research. 7 p.m. April 5. $25.

St. Andrew’s Hall, 431 E. Congress, Detroit; 313-961-8137.

 

Photograph by Sandrine Lee Courtesy of Montuno.

Esperanza Spalding

In 2011, Esperanza Spalding won a Grammy Award for Best New Artist, making her the first jazz musician to ever win this title. Spalding left high school at the age of 16 and completed her GED. She then enrolled at Portland State University — thanks to a music scholarship — where she was the youngest jazz bass player in the program. On the encouragement of her teacher, she auditioned for the Berklee College of Music, where she received another scholarship. Gary Burton, Executive Vice President at Berklee, says that Spalding “communicates her upbeat personality in everything she plays.” 8 p.m. April 6. $20+.

Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-668-8463.

 

Photograph by Peyton Hoge.

Bob Seger

Michigan native Bob Seger arrived on the Detroit music scene in 1961 and formed The Silver Bullet Band in 1973 with a group of local musicians. Together, they recorded Live Bullet at Cobo Hall, live. Seger took a break from the music industry for 10 years after his 1991 record, The Fire Inside. During that time, he won the Port Huron to Mackinac Boat Race aboard his sailboat, Lightning, which he then sold. Seger’s songs about love, women, and the blue-collar life landed him a place in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Jennifer Granholm even declared March 15 “Bob Seger Day.” Today, Seger lives in Orchard Lake Village but spends his winters in Naples, Fla. 7:30 p.m. April 11. $149+.

Palace of Auburn Hills, 4 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 248-377-0100.

 

Living Colour

Known for its creative fusion of jazz, funk, hip-hop, rock, heavy metal, and for political lyrics, Living Colour was formed out of a nonprofit organization, Black Rock Coalition. The band performed regularly at CGBG’s and participated in the inaugural Lollapalooza tour in 1991 after reaching mainstream success. They’ve recently been receiving new exposure thanks to their songs appearing in various video games and in a WWE promotional video. 8 p.m. April 12. $30+.

Magic Bag, 22920 Woodward, Ferndale; 248-544-3030.

 

Yes

Before the huge success of the hit song “Owner of a Lonely Heart,” Yes had blazed the long, abstract trail of progressive rock in the ’70s. By the time “Owner” came out in 1983, Yes had gone through at least six lineup changes and one major breakup. Some fans even began distinguishing this era of the band as “Yes West” because of the band’s move to Los Angeles and its radio-friendly bent. Now, more than 40 years after the band’s formation, Yes continues on, and still won’t take “no” for an answer. 7:30 p.m. April 12. $58+.

Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-983-6000.

 

Boz Scaggs

William Royce “Boz” Scaggs gained fame in the 1960s as a guitarist and singer in the Steve Miller Band. Scaggs was born in Ohio the son of a traveling salesman. His family later moved to Texas, where he earned the nickname “Bosley” from his classmates, and later shortened it to “Boz.” He met Steve Miller when he was only 12, and Scaggs appeared on the Steve Miller Band’s first two albums before striking out on his own. Scaggs lives in Napa County, Calif., where he produces his own wine. 9 p.m. April 13. $90+.

The Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, 377 Riverside Drive East, Windsor; 888-345-5885.

 

Fab Faux

The Fab Faux are committed to performing accurate reproductions of The Beatles’ repertoire, and often perform material that The Fab Four never performed live. The group was started by Jimmy Vivino, bandleader for Conan, and Will Lee, bassist for Late Show with David Letterman. They’ll be performing cuts from The White Album. 8 p.m. April 13. $49.50+.

Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-668-8463.

 

Mr. B’s Blues and Boogie Celebration

Born in Flint as Mark Lincoln Braun, Mr. B became interested in piano at a young age. He began studying under Boogie Woogie Red and immersed himself in blues and boogie culture. He attended the University of Michigan for three years before dropping out to pursue his music career. Mr. B is considered one of the most successful purveyors of a vanishing art and is in high demand for performances and educational programs. He has performed throughout Europe, Mexico, Canada, and South America. Put on your boogie shoes and see Mr. B at 7:30 p.m. April 13. $25.

The Ark, 316 S. Main, Ann Arbor; 734-761-1800.

 

The Black Crowes

Formed in 1989, the Black Crowes have churned out nine studio albums and four live albums, selling over 30 million copies. The band draws inspiration from Southern rock, blues, and psychedelic pop. The Crowes have opened for some of the most famous rock acts including Robert Plant, The Grateful Dead, ZZ Top, and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. They’ve been listed as one of the “100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock” and labeled as “the most rock ’n’ roll rock ’n’ roll band in the world.” Shake your money maker at 7 p.m. April 14. $40+.

The Fillmore, 2115 Woodward, Detroit; 313-961-5451.

 

Great Big Sea

This Canadian folk band is best known for its energetic interpretations of traditional Newfoundland songs, inspired by its Scottish and French heritage. Great Big Sea played its first gig in 1993 and toured almost nonstop in the early years, sometimes traveling 300 days a year to play for $100 and beer. The band is now celebrating its 20-year anniversary. Great Big Sea makes use of many esoteric instruments, including mandolin, bouzouki, tin whistle, fiddle, accordion, and concertina. 8 p.m. April 16. $36+.

Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-668-8463.

 

Graham Parker and The Rumour

Frontman Graham Parker got his start playing in a Beatles lookalike band when he was 13, but none of the members actually played instruments. In 1976, Parker paired up with Brinsley Schwarz, Bob Andrews, Martin Belmont, Andrew Bodnar, and Stephen Goulding to form Graham Parker and The Rumour. The original group broke up in the 1980s, and many of the members pursued solo careers. Parker reunited with all five original members of The Rumour to record a new album in 2011. They also appeared as themselves in the 2012 Judd Apatow film This is 40. 8 p.m. April 16. $25-$28.

Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-668-8463.

 

Alicia Keys

Alicia Keys started playing classical piano when she was 7, began writing songs at 14, and graduated from the Professional Performing Arts School as valedictorian at only 16. She was accepted into Columbia University at the same time she signed with Columbia Records. After attempting to do both, she dropped out of school and released her first studio album in 2001. She has since sold over 35 million albums worldwide. She is also committed to philanthropy and co-founded Keep a Child Alive, an organization that provides medicine to families in Africa. 7 p.m. April 17. $58.50+.

Joe Louis Arena, 600 Civic Center Dr., Detroit; 313-983-6606.

 

Josh Ritter

Josh Ritter wears many hats: singer, guitarist, songwriter, and author. He began his musical career as a teenager, inspired by Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan. He initially attempted to write songs on a lute that his father had built, but eventually abandoned that idea and bought his first guitar at Kmart. When he was 21, he moved from Idaho to Scotland and recorded his first album. He’s set to record his seventh album in May and has also published a novel, Bright’s Passage. 7:30 p.m. April 17. $24+.

Royal Oak Music Theatre, 318 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-399-2980.

 

Bobby McFerrin

Known for the No. 1 pop hit “Don’t Worry, Be Happy,” McFerrin has had other songs that have won him a total of 10 Grammy Awards. He was born into the music industry: His dad is an operatic baritone, and his mom is a singer. McFerrin is praised for his unique vocal techniques and the percussive effects he makes with his mouth and by tapping on his chest. In 1988, “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” was used as George H. W. Bush’s election song without the artist’s permission. McFerrin protested and dropped the song from his own performance repertoire. But don’t worry, ’cuz it’s back now. 7:30 p.m. April 18. $10+.

Hill Auditorium, 825 N. University, Ann Arbor; 734-763-3333.

 

Morris Day and the Time

Morris Day began his musical career in high school when he was in a band with Prince. After Prince hit it big, he decided to form a side-project, the Time, and chose Day as the lead singer. The band was assembled under a clause in Prince’s contract with Warner Bros., allowing him to recruit other artists for the label. Day left the group after arguments with Prince and pursued a solo music and acting career. Several members of the group reunited in 1995, added a few fresh faces, and called themselves Morris Day and the Time. The time to see the Time is 8 p.m. April 18. $39+.

Sound Board at MotorCity Casino Hotel, 2901 Grand River, Detroit; 313-237-7711.

 

The Proclaimers and JP Jones

Led by Scottish brothers Craig and Charlie Reid, the Proclaimers have been making music since 1987. They’re best known for their single “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles),” and their pop, folk, punk, and new-wave musical hybrid. They’re currently touring with JP Jones, the bassist, keyboardist, and co-writer for Led Zeppelin who has since had a successful solo career. He also plays koto, lap steep guitar, mandolin, auto harp, violin, ukulele, sitar, cello, and the continuum. Even if you have to walk 500 miles, see the Proclaimers with JP Jones at 8 p.m. April 19. $25+.

The Ark, 316 S. Main, Ann Arbor; 734-761-1800.

 

Kris Allen

Kris Allen began playing viola in elementary school, but didn’t realize until college that he wanted a career in the music industry. He recorded his first album, Brand New Shoes, after working as a shoe salesman. Allen went on to win the eighth season of American Idol, and five of his songs charted the Billboard Hot 100. Before appearing on Idol, Allen participated in several missionary trips around the world. He continues his philanthropy and has worked with the United Nations Foundation, TOMS shoes, and Music Empowers. Allen’s fans have been inspired by his charitable efforts and have organized events in his honor. For Allen’s birthday, fans donated more than $25,000 to Heifer International and more than $26,000 to Direct Relief International. 8 p.m. April 22. $20.

The Ark, 316 S. Main, Ann Arbor; 734-761-1800.

 

Natalie Cole

Daughter of jazz legend Nat King Cole, Natalie Cole has sold over 30 million records worldwide. At the age of 6, Cole sang on her father’s Christmas album and began performing when she was only 11. After releasing her first album, Cole became an instant success and was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. She experienced career difficulties due to health problems caused by excessive drug use, but made a stage comeback in 2009 and released an autobiography of her life experiences. 9 p.m. April 26. $35+.

The Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, 377 Riverside Drive East, Windsor; 888-345-5885.

 

Il Divo

This operatic pop vocal group was created by former American Idol judge Simon Cowell. The idea for the group came to Cowell while watching The Sopranos. He conducted a two-year worldwide search for singers to join his group, resulting in a final ensemble of singers from Spain, Switzerland, France, and the United States. The group performed as Barbra Streisand’s special guests on her North American tour after a career-defining performance on The Oprah Winfrey Show. 8 p.m. April 28. $70+.

The Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, 377 Riverside Drive East, Windsor; 888-345-5885.

 

 


Theater

 

 

Bonstelle Theatre

In a musical comedy based on a supermarket tabloid, Bat Boy: The Musical tells the story of a half-boy, half-bat creature who grew up in a cave. April 12-21. $25.

3424 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-577-2960; bonstelle.com.

 

Detroit Repertory Theatre

A Thousand Circlets continues this month. Architect Earl Leighton hosts a family gathering, intending to announce he’s building a skyscraper. However, his announcement is dulled when it’s revealed he’s losing his memory. Until May 19. $17, $20.

13103 Woodrow Wilson, Detroit; 313-868-3686; detroitreptheater.com.

 

Eastern Michigan University Theatre

Julia and Herman’s love story hits some major bumps in the road. Dealing with South Carolina’s interracial marriage laws in 1918, the couple is forced to keep their love under wraps in the inspiring play, Wedding Band: A Love/Hate Story in Black and White. April 5-14. $7-$15.

103 Quirk Building, Ypsilanti; 734-487-2282; emich.edu/emutheatre.

 

Fisher Theatre

Winner of the 2010 Tony Award for best musical, Memphis tells the story of aspiring radio DJ Huey Calhoun as he works to change the radio industry by playing the rock ’n’ roll music from underground black dance clubs. Set in the 1950s, the show offers laughter, emotion, and roof-raising tunes. April 9-21. $34-$89.

3011 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-872-1000; broadwayindetroit.com.

 

Fox Theatre

The classic story of the boy who wouldn’t grow up, Peter Pan offers magical spectacle to enchant audiences and families. April 19-21. $30-$70.

2211 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-471-6611; olympiaentertainment.com.

 

Henry Ford Community College

Illustrating tragedies of the Democratic Republic of Congo’s civil war, the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama Ruined examines the political, economic, and cultural forces through the life of a shrewd businesswoman. April 11-21. $12-$15.

5101 Evergreen Rd., Dearborn; 313-845-9817; theatre.hfcc.edu.

 

Hilberry Theatre

• The friendship forged between two couples in a suburban neighborhood quickly spirals out of control in Detroit. The comedy explores what happens when you open yourself up to new experiences. Through April 5.

• In an infamous French insane asylum, the Marquis de Sade directs other inmates to re-create the murder of Jean-Paul Marat in Marat/Sade, a play-within-a-play based on true events. April 19-May 11. $20-$30.

4743 Cass, Detroit; 313-577-2972; hilberry.com.

 

Meadow Brook Theatre

• In a new musical featuring 1960s hits, Life Could Be a Dream will keep audiences engaged, laughing, and singing along. April 24-May-19.

• In The Constant Wife, well-mannered London doctor Constance Middleton hides her knowledge of her husband’s affair with her best friend in order to pull out a few surprises of her own. Through April 14. $25-$40.

207 Wilson Hall, Rochester; 248-377-3300; mbtheatre.com.

 

Plowshares Theatre Company

In Gem of the Ocean, a play by Pulitzer Prize winner August Wilson, Aunt Ester, a 287-year-old family matriarch and former slave, teaches her houseguests about healing, redemption, and forgiveness. April 19-May 12. $10-$32.

3663 Woodward Ave. Suite 150, Detroit; 313-744-3181; plowshares.org.

 

Performance Network

Premiering in Michigan after a run on Broadway, The Mountaintop chronicles Martin Luther King Jr., in his Memphis hotel room the night before his assassination. April 25-June 2. $27-$41.

120 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor; 734-663-0681; performancenetwork.org.

 

Planet Ant

Fish Dinner: Second Helping, the award-winning one-man show returns with new and familiar faces. April 5-20. $20.

2357 Caniff St., Hamtramck; 313-365-4948; planetant.com.

 

Tipping Point Theatre

In a comedy of manners, Mrs. Mannerly follows 10-year-old Jeffrey, who is obsessed with good manners, as he attempts to maneuver his way to the top of his etiquette class. April 4-May 5. $29-$32.

361 E. Cady St., Northville; 248-347-0003; tippingpointtheatre.com.

 

University Musical Society

In a modernized version of Euripides’ The Trojan Women, this anti-war drama is a meditation on the moments of individual choice that separate death and life, despair and hope, future and past. April 27-28. $18-$48.

121 Fletcher St., Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538; ums.org.

 

University of Detroit Mercy

In a compilation of works by Pulitzer Prize-nominated writer Theresa Rebeck, A Cabaret of Theresa Rebeck’s Plays will showcase the talents of the faculty and staff in a production that will be full of drama and humor. April 12-21. $10 students, $17-$20 adults.

8425 W. McNichols Rd., Detroit; 313-927-1545; theatre.udmercy.edu.

 

Send information at least nine weeks in advance to: Listings, Hour Detroit, 117 W. Third St., Royal Oak, MI 48067. By e-mail: editorial@hourdetroit.
 By fax: 248-691-4531.  

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