A Few Questions With ... Craig Fahle

The Detroit Riverfront Conservancy’s decade of working to transform the city’s waterfront is paying off.


Published:

(page 1 of 2)

Rivard Plaza, before (left) and after (right).
 

Success and Detroit ... two words that we haven’t seen paired together enough in recent years. With so much of the attention focused on the decline of Detroit, it’s not surprising that genuine success stories get crowded out. When we talk about Detroit’s true “jewels,” we really must now include the riverfront. Frankly, it’s a jewel we had neglected for decades. Rapid industrialization led to quick development of the waterfront … with little thought to access for those of us who live here. Factories were placed next to condominiums. Cement silos next to public parks. Quality urban planning wasn’t exactly the city’s forte in the early 20th century. Fortunately, that’s changed. In the last decade, the riverfront has been opened up and transformed into something we can legitimately be proud of. The Detroit Riverfront Conservancy took on the task of rethinking our waterfront 10 years ago, and what a difference a decade makes. Anyone who hopes to explore the city really should start with a trip to the RiverWalk. The three miles of pathways are beautiful, family-friendly, clean, and free … with a lot more still to come. I recently sat down with Faye Nelson, president and CEO of the Conservancy, and its board chair, Matt Cullen, who also heads up the M-1 Rail project.

CF: What was this project like in its earliest days? What was the level of faith that this could work?
FN: I think in the early days the level was quite strong. Strong with respect to those individuals and organizations that did believe that Detroit had a future, that a waterfront could be developed, and that we could work together as a community. That being said, when we first began this journey, there was, quite frankly, quite a bit of skepticism in the sense that we live in a community that is not known for its ability to work together. The city vs. the suburbs, suburbs vs. the city … but this was an opportunity to come together and demonstrate that we could work together and we could accomplish great things.

CF: Matt, the Conservancy is an organization that doesn’t have a lot of overhead; it’s not bloated in any way … about a dozen people work on this on a day-to-day basis. How important is that?
MC: That’s a good point. This is a lean and very capable staff and organization. It’s incumbent that we demonstrate that we can do it that way, that we can do it efficiently, that we can be very thoughtful about how we deploy resources. We don’t have a tax base or something else that we can tax or borrow against. All of the money that we raise we get through philanthropy and through working with our partners. We’re very thoughtful about how we spend that money, how we staff up, and how we maintain the property. That’s really helped us. This isn’t an organization that was put together to build a one-time project. This is an organization that was set up to transform the riverfront and maintain it for the next 100 years. It has to be sustainable.


Omni Talon, before and after.
 

CF: One of the things that seems to have made this project so successful is that at its heart, it’s about giving riverfront access to the people. Economic development is obviously a goal, too … but at the center, it’s about creating something people can use. How important was that in getting people to buy into what you were doing?
FN: For decades, the riverfront has been in such major disrepair. When you travel to other parts of the world, you come back and ask yourself, “Why can’t we do something with our waterfront?” There is such a sense of pride that’s developing as a result of this beautiful waterfront. We have so many phone calls of people requesting information. ... We’re on the list of the top five places for family reunions. So it has been a journey of pride and emotion for the whole community, and just as importantly, this project has demonstrated its economic value and contribution to the city.

Edit Module
Edit Module Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Content

Meet the Makers: Brian Day

This photographer is taking an overhead look at Detroit

An Hour With... Candice S. Miller

Macomb County Public Works Commissioner

Dry Times: Looking Back 100 Years After Prohibition

A century ago, Detroit became the first city in the nation to prohibit alcohol

Motherhood in Metro Detroit

From pre-pregnancy thoughts to developing unconditional love, several local women give a glimpse into their lives as ‘mom’

The Way It Was

Ginsburg Branch, Detroit Public Library, 1916
Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Most Popular

  1. 7 Michigan Breweries Worth a Trip
    Check out these must-visit locations during your summer travels
  2. To Market, to Market
    Michigan Wine & Cider Festival at Eastern Market May 24
  3. Hour Media’s Real Estate All-Star Party 2017
    Hour Media's Real Estate All-Stars celebrated at the fourth annual Real Estate All-Star Party...
  4. Your Guide to Michigan’s Odd and Unusual Festivals
    We rounded up some of the state’s most niche events, celebrating everything from fishflies to...
  5. Meet the Southwest Detroit Pizzeria Serving Sospeso
    PizzaPlex in southwest Detroit is challenging what it means to be a new business on the block
  6. Dry Times: Looking Back 100 Years After Prohibition
    A century ago, Detroit became the first city in the nation to prohibit alcohol
  7. An Hour With... Candice S. Miller
    Macomb County Public Works Commissioner
  8. ‘Grazie Mille’ For the Memories
    Adventures abound in Italy with Michigan winemaker, grape growers
  9. The Gentleman’s Guide to Style
    From grooming to shopping, a comprehensive directory for stylish men in metro Detroit
  10. Motherhood in Metro Detroit
    From pre-pregnancy thoughts to developing unconditional love, several local women give a glimpse...