Arts and Entertainment



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ART

 

 

Anton Art Center

An Art Center tradition, the 38th Michigan Annual is an all-media fine art competition open to Michigan artists and features a special display of Mount Clemens artifacts from Mayor Barb Dempsey’s collection. Through Feb. 25.

125 Macomb Place, Mount Clemens; 586-469-8666; theartcenter.org.

 

Art Center

Wit, Wisdumb, and Worry features large-scale prints and several installations from long-time artist colleagues Randy Bolton, Michael Krueger, and Tom Reed. Through Feb. 5. • Inherent State features 3-D fiber artwork crossed with spoken word and poetry from two sets of sisters. Feb. 10-March 18.

117 W. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-994-8004, ext. 101; annarborartcenter.org.

 

Artcite

New artwork from Victor Romão highlights the artist’s interest in drawing, sculpture, performance, and print media. Through Feb. 18. • Artist Emily Hermant showcases several hand-constructed workbenches. Feb. 24-April 7. Opening reception Feb. 10.

109 University Ave. W., Windsor; 519-977-6564; artcite.ca.

 

Art Gallery of Windsor (AGW)

Art for Canada: An Illustrated History is the gallery’s ongoing exhibition featuring a changing selection of historic Canadian artwork. • Artwork from Luanne Martineau is on display through March 25. • John Kissick: A Nervous Decade presents a 10-year survey of his work. Through March 25. •  The Optimism of Color: William Perehudoff, A Retrospective features more than 60 works from the abstract painter. Through April 1.

401 Riverside Dr. W., Windsor, Ontario; 519-977-0013; artgalleryofwindsor.com.

 

Circ du Soleil brings its stunning display of acrobatics in Quidam to Joe Louis Arena on Feb 25.

 

Artspace II

Woodcuts of the Arts and Crafts Movement includes a collection of prints from American and European artists working in an aestheticism influenced by Japanese composition. Feb. 1-28.

303 E. Maple, Birmingham; 248-258-1540; artspace2.com.

 

Biddle Gallery

Made in the Mitten is the gallery’s ongoing exhibition of works by more than 100 Michigan artists.

2840 Biddle, Wyandotte; 734-281-4779; biddlegallery.com.

 

Birmingham Bloomfield Art Center (BBAC)

New mural paintings by Victor Pytko are on display in the Robinson Gallery. • Artwork from the Detroit Society of Women Painters is on display in the Kantgias/DeSalle Gallery. • Drawings from Allison Pascarew are on exhibit in the Deforrest/Watson Ramp Gallery. • Figurative work from the students of Amy Foster is on display in the LaBan Commons Gallery. All exhibitions through Feb. 3.

1516 S. Cranbrook, Birmingham; 248-644-0866; bbartcenter.org.

 

Cranbrook Art Museum

No Object Is an Island: New Dialogues with the Cranbrook Collection is the first exhibit to open in the newly renovated and expanded museum. The exhibit features work from 50 leading contemporary artists and designers, as well as objects from the museum’s permanent collection of 20th- and 21st-century artwork. Runs through March 25. Admission: $8 adults; $6 seniors; $4 full-time students. Children under 12 free.

39221 Woodward, Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-3320; cranbrookart.edu/museum.

 

David Klein Gallery

Contemporary art is on display throughout the gallery during February.

163 Townsend St., Birmingham; 248-433-3700; dkgallery.com.

 

Detroit Institute of Arts

Rembrandt and the Face of Jesus focuses on works by the Dutch master and his students depicting Jesus and events described in the Bible. Through Feb. 12. • Gift of a Lifetime: The James Pearson Duffy Collection showcases the varied collection of drawings, paintings, prints, sculptures, and photographs from one of Detroit’s most unconventional and respected collectors. Through March 18. • Detroit Revealed: Photographs 2000-2010 features more than 50 photographs by contemporary artists who shed light on the Motor City through their camera lens. Through April 8. • Once Upon a Time: Prints and Drawings that Tell Stories includes artwork from familiar series, portfolios, and books. Through June 24. Admission: $8 adults; $6 seniors; $4 youth 6-17; under 5 free. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Thurs.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun.; Closed Mon.-Tue.

5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org.

 

Elaine L. Jacob Gallery

An African art exhibition is on display through March 16.

480 W. Hancock, Detroit; 313-993-7813; art.wayne.edu.

 

Flint Institute of Arts

Marylyn Dintenfass: Autobiography and Other Anecdotes brings the artist’s abstract, automotive-themed artwork to paper. Through Feb. 12. • Witness: The Art of Jerry Pinkney highlights the artist’s journey with more than 100 illustrations and watercolors. Through April 15. • Karsten Creightney: Works on Paper features the artist’s use of a variety of media to create images that capture the real and the imagined. Feb. 18-April 29. • Captured in Glass: Historic and Contemporary Paperweights is the decorative arts gallery’s inaugural exhibition, which includes 300 works. Through June 10. Admission: $7 adults; $5 seniors; under 12 free. 12-5 p.m. Mon.-Wed. and Fri.; 12-9 p.m. Thurs.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sun.

1120 E. Kearsley, Flint; 810-234-1695; flintarts.org.

 

Grosse Pointe Art Center

The Urban Edge exhibition is on display through Feb. 25.

16900 Kercheval, Grosse Pointe; 313-821-1848; grossepointeartcenter.org

 

Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

Artwork from Tom Phardel and Sharon Que in A Three-Dimensional Perspective is on display through May.

7400 Bay Valley, Saginaw; 989-964-7125; svsu.edu/mfsm.

 

MOCAD

Joshua White and Gary Panter’s Light Show is on exhibit Feb. 10-April 29.

4454 Woodward, Detroit; 313-832-6622; mocadetroit.org.

 

NCA Gallery

The National Conference of Artists features the exhibition Standard Time Portfolio: Works by Midwest Artists. Through Feb. 18.

18100 Meyers, Detroit; 313-342-1786; ncamich.org.

 

Oakland University Art Gallery

Idealizing the Imaginary: Invention and Illusion in Contemporary Painting showcases the work of 14 artists exploring the expansion of the imaginary and the clichés of realism. Through April 1.

208 Wilson Hall on the Oakland University campus, Rochester; 248-370-3005; ouartgallery.org.

 

Paint Creek Center for the Arts

A small group show for four artists features unique work in sculpture, drawing, painting, installation, and mixed media. Through Feb. 17.

407 Pine St., Rochester; 248-651-4110;

 

River’s Edge Gallery

Homage features 50 artists paying homage through artwork to someone who has influenced their lives and work. Feb. 10-March 31. Special receptions on Feb. 17 and March 16.

3024 Biddle, Wyandotte; 734-246-9880; artattheedge.com.

 

Scarab Club

The annual unthemed, all-media Silver Medal Exhibition is on display through Feb. 12. • Women Image Color is an invitational exhibition curated by Marilyn Zimmerman. Feb. 15-March 25. Artist receptions for both Feb. 17.

217 Farnsworth, Detroit; 313-831-1250; scarabclub.org.

 

Toledo Museum of Art

Storytelling in Miniature showcases about 140 miniature prints from the Renaissance to modern times. Through March 4. • Small World highlights the work of five artists who created more than 40 little worlds through relief paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs, video, and art installations. Through March 25. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thur.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.; 12-6 p.m. Sun.

2445 Monroe, Toledo; 419-255-8000; toledomuseum.org.

 

UMMA

Face of Our Time includes more than 100 works by photographers Jacob Aue Sobol, Jim Goldberg, Zanele Muholi, Daniel Schwartz, and Richard Misrach. The images examine our world today and the political, social, and economic struggles many face. Through Feb. 5. • Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life showcases the work of artists including George Brecht and Yoko Ono as they blur the boundaries between art and life. Feb. 25-May 20. • Sculptor Mark di Suvero received the National Medal of the Arts from President Barack Obama in March 2011. His exhibit, Tabletops, is exclusive to Ann Arbor and features 15 of his smaller pieces. Through Feb. 26. • Recent Acquisitions: Curator’s Choice Part I is the first of a two-part exhibition introducing newly acquired works from artists such as Annie Leibovitz, Rembrandt, and others. Through March 18. • Robert Wilson: Video 50 consists of 30-second episodes of tiny dramas that highlight surreal imagery and non-linear narratives. Through April 29.

525 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-764-0395; umma.umich.edu.

 

Wayne State University Art Department Gallery

The WSU MFA Thesis exhibition is on display through Feb. 10.

150 Art Building, Detroit; 313-993-7813; art.wayne.edu.

 

Whitdel Arts

A membership exhibition is up through Feb. 3.

1250 Hubbard, Suite B1, Detroit; 313-899-2243; whitdelarts.com

 

WSG Gallery

New work from sculptor Francesc Burgos runs through Feb. 12.

306 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-2287; wsg-art.com.

 

 

 

 

Classical

 

 

Brunch with Bach

Join the Solaire Quartet for a delicious meal and saxophone quartet arrangements featuring music by Handel, Piazzola, and Iturralde. 11 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. Feb. 12. $15-$30.

 Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org.

 

Chamber Music Society of Detroit

Pianist Peter Serkin joins the Shanghai Quartet for a performance of works by Mozart, Brahms, and Bright Sheng. 8 p.m. Feb. 11. $25-$75.

Seligman Performing Arts Center, 22305 W. 13 Mile, Beverly Hills; 248-855-6070, comehearcmsd.org.

 

Cranbrook Music Guild

German-born Juilliard graduate Andreas Klein studied with Claudio Arrau and has created a series of television programs seen on PBS. His piano performance will include works by Beethoven, Schumann, and Schubert. 3 p.m. Feb. 12. $30.

Christ Chruch Cranbrook, 470 Church Rd, Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-0097; cranbrookmusicguild.org.

 

Detroit Chamber Winds & Strings

Enjoy brass works spanning four centuries, including new pieces by composer Paul Dooley in Love Your Brass. 3 p.m. Feb. 19. $10-$25.

First Presbyterian Church of Royal Oak, 529 Hendrie, Royal Oak; 248-559-2095; detroitchamberwinds.org

 

Detroit Symphony Orchestra

Leonard Slatkin conducts Einstein’s Dream, composed by the conductor’s wife, Cindy McTee, as well as Rachmaninov’s Symphonic Dances and Shostakovich’s First Violin Concerto, with soloist Julian Rachlin. Feb. 24 & Feb. 26. $15-$103.50. • Emmanuel Ax performs the solo duties in Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 22 in a program that also includes Mahler’s Symphony No. 5. Slatkin is at the helm. Feb. 17-18. $15-$103.50. • Brahms’ epic work, A German Requiem, and John Adams’ response to 9/11, On the Transmigration of Souls, are performed with the University Musical Society Choral Union. Slatkin is on the podium. Feb. 24 & Feb. 26. $15-$103.50.

Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward, Detroit; 313-576-5111; detroitsymphony.com.

 

Sphinx Competition

Created to increase cultural diversity in classical music, the Sphinx Finals concert gives junior-high, high-school, and college-age African-American and Latino string players the opportunity to compete for a place in the Sphinx Symphony Orchestra. Enjoy performances from top contenders as they engage in competition. 2 p.m. Feb. 12. $12.

Max M. Fisher Music Center, 3711 Woodward, Detroit; 313-877-9100; sphinxmusic.org.

 

University Musical Society

Wynton Marsalis directs the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. This performance celebrates Marsalis’ 50th birthday and highlights works he’s written for big band. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 22. $10-$54. Hill Auditorium,  • Sabine Meyer and the Trio Di Clarone, composed of her husband and brother, perform clarinet classics by Stravinsky, Bach, Mozart, and others. 8 p.m. Feb. 4. $22-$48. • With performances representing poetic images such as gallant warriors of the past and happy days of childhood, the Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra perform on Chinese instruments rarely heard in the West. This ensemble provides a look into traditional Chinese classical music. 8 p.m. Feb. 10. $18-$38. • The Michigan Chamber Players gather for a performance featuring works by Brahms and classics from Fiddler on the Roof and Phantom of the Opera. 4 p.m. Feb. 12. Free. • Internationally regarded as one of the top string quartets of the day, the Hagen Quartet presents a program of Beethoven quartets. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 23. $22-$46. Rackham Auditorium, 915 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor; 734-763-3333.

Hill Auditorium, 825  N. University, Ann Arbor, 734-763-3333, ums.org.
Rackham Auditorium, 915 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor; 734-763-3333.

 

 

 

Dance

 

 

Eisenhower Dance Ensemble

The annual celebration of innovative dance is presented at the New DANCEfest X with choreography by artistic director Laurie Eisenhower and a revival of Steven Iannacone’s Bolero, set to the music of Ravel. 8 p.m. Feb. 11. $20-$25.

Jewish Community Center, 6600 W. Maple, Bloomfield Hills; 248-661-1900; ede-dance.org.

 

University Musical Society

Random Dance, with direction by Wayne McGregor, incorporate virtual dancers, 3-D architecture, and a radical approach to new technology into their choreography. 8 p.m. Feb. 18. $20-$46.

Power Center, 121 Fletcher, Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538; ums.org.

 

 

 

Events

 

 

Cirque Du Soleil Quidam

Since its premiere in 1996, the production has toured on five continents and has been seen by millions. The international cast features 52 acrobats, musicians, singers and characters, who help Young Zoe find a meaning to her life and she slips into the world of Quidam. Feb. 2-5. $35-$100.

Joe Louis Arena, 600 Civic Center Dr., Detroit; 800-745-3000.

 

Motown Winter Blast

Centered at Campus Martius, the festival includes everything from free ice-skating, ice sculptures, snowshoeing, marshmallow roasting, a winter carnival, as well as other activities. The event partners with Matrix Human Services, which asks festival-goers to donate $1 or a non-perishable food item or book. Feb. 10-12.

Campus Martius, 800 Woodward, Detroit; winterblast.com.

 

Nuclear Cowboyz

Feld Motor Sports, Inc. producer of this all-new freestyle motorcross North American Tour, promises a show that pushes the extreme with a futuristic narrative told through freestyle action. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 11. $33.

The Palace of Auburn Hills, 6 Championship Drive, Auburn Hills; nuclearcowboyz.com.

 

Detroit Boat Show

Shop for ski boats, fishing boats, pontoons, cruisers, personal watercraft, paddleboats, inflatables, and more. Also, all things boating related are featured, including service, accessories, engines, trailers, and dockage. Feb. 11-19. $12.

Cobo Center, 1 Washington Blvd., Detroit; boatmichigan.org.

 

Metro Detroit Go Red for Women Luncheon

mpaign to help raise awareness of heart disease in women. The annual luncheon includes interactive health exhibits, health screenings, and an auction. 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Feb. 17. $175.

MGM Grand Detroit, 1777 Third St., Detroit; 248-936-5831.

 

Cottage and Lakefront Living Show

Everything you need to know about living in a cottage or lakefront home is on display at this fifth annual event. Exhibits include log, timber frame, cedar homes, cottage rentals, designers, architects, cottage furnishings, lakeshore maintenance, and boats. Feb. 23-26. $4-$10.

Suburban Collection Showplace, 46100 Grand River, Novi; showspan.com/CLD/Home.aspx.

 

 

 

FILM

 

 

Detroit Film Theatre

Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey is a documentary about Kevin Clash, the man behind the beloved children’s character. Narrated by Whoopi Goldberg. Feb. 3-5. $7.50 adults, $6.50 students and seniors. • 2011 Academy Award Nominated Short Films gives viewers a chance to see both animated and live-action film nominees and to predict the winners before the Oscars are handed out. Feb. 10-12 and Feb. 17-19. $7.50 adults, $6.50 students and seniors. • A Separation tells the story of a married couple faced with a tough decision: to improve their daughter’s life by moving to another country or to stay in Iran to look after a sick parent. Feb. 24-26 and March 2-4. $7.50 adults, $6.50 students and seniors.

5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org.

 

Redford Theatre

Charade explores the themes of romance, suspense, and mystery in Paris as a woman is pursued by several men who want the fortune her murdered husband stole from them. Audrey Hepburn and Cary Grant star in the 1963 film. Feb. 3-4. $4. • Complications and a bubbling romance emerge in The Apartment when a man (Jack Lemmon) trying to move up in his company allows his executives to use his apartment for trysts. Also starring Shirley MacLaine. Feb. 17-18. $4.

17360 Lahser, Detroit; 313-537-2560; redfordtheatre.com.

 

 

 

MUSEUMS

 

 

Arab American National Museum

Patriots & Peacemakers: Arab Americans in Service to Our Country showcases stories of heroism and self-sacrifice that Arab-Americans have played in our country. Through June 12. Arab Civilization: Our Heritage features Arab contributions to the early world. Ongoing in the Community Courtyard. • Coming to America focuses on Arab immigrants and the culture they brought to the United States. Ongoing in Gallery 1. • Living in America exhibits early Arab-American life. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 2. • Making an Impact celebrates the stories of Arab-American athletes, organizations, physicians, labor leaders, and entertainers. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 3. $6 adults; $3 students and seniors. Under 5 free.

13624 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-2266, arabamericanmuseum.org.

 

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

Moving to His Own Beat-Fela: The Man, the Movement, the Music is an exhibit that celebrates the life and music of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. Through April 1. • Mixing Metaphors: The Aesthetic, Social and Political in African American Art is composed of more than 90 paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, sculptures and mixed-media by 36 artists. Through June 3. • The Chris Webber Collection: Exceptional People During Extraordinary Times, 1755-Present highlights rare artifacts from the personal collection of Chris Webber, native Detroiter, National Association All-Star player, and NBA announcer. His pieces reflect the lives and legacies of African-American greats such as Phyllis Wheatley, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther King Jr. • Stories in Stained Glass: The Art of Samuel A. Hodge, a series of colorful works focusing on three areas of African-American culture and history — musicians, dancers, and freedom advocates — is one of the ongoing exhibits in the Main Level Corridor. • A Is for Africa includes 26 interactive stations making up a 3-D “dictionary” designed for children. Ongoing in the Lower Level Corridor. • And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture is an evolving exhibit that recounts the 3.5-million-year-old odyssey that began in Africa and ends in Detroit. Ongoing in the Core Exhibition Gallery. • Ring of Genealogy, a work designed by local artist Hubert Massey, depicts the struggles of African-Americans in the United States. • Detroit Performs! is a photomontage dedicated to those who have called Detroit home and have gained national or international attention in the performing arts. Artists include John Lee Hooker, Aretha Franklin, Derrick May, and Kevin Saunderson. Ongoing on the Main Level. • $5-$8.

315 E. Warren, Detroit; 313-494-5800, chwmuseum.org.

 

Detroit Historical Museum

Streets of Old Detroit takes visitors back to the 19th and early 20th centuries through shop settings furnished with artifacts from the 1840s to early 1900s. • Doorway to Freedom highlights Detroit’s role as part of the Underground Railroad, the last American stop for freedom-seeking slaves before boating across the Detroit River to Canada. • Frontiers to Factories shows what Detroit was like before the advent of automobiles. See how the area changed from a trading-post settlement to a metropolis with millions of residents and factories. •Meier’s Wonderful Clock was built to demonstrate the skills of clockmaker Louis Meier Sr. Weighing 2,500 pounds, the clock stands at 15-feet high and 7-feet wide, and was shown at the Michigan State Fair in 1906 and Chicago World’s Fair in 1934. •Detroit’s Official Symbols explains symbols throughout the city, such as the city’s flag. • Glancy Trains are from the collection of Alfred R. Glancy Jr., co-owner of the Empire State Building. Also: Saying I Do: Metro Detroit Weddings, Detroit Toy Stories,  Motor City, Fabulous 5: Detroit’s Destinations, Janet Anderson, and Lorenzo Cultural Center Exhibit — 1950s: Affluence and Anxiety in the Atomic Age. New to the museum: 1914 Anderson Detroit Electric, William B. Stout, and  Boy Scouts of America — Great Lakes Council. Opening Feb. 25, Detroit Artists Market. General admission: $4-$6.

5401 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-1805, detroithistorical.org.

 

Detroit Science Center

Exhibits include a rocket laboratory, fitness-and-nutrition station, as well as a heart-health display. Also, the center offers the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America, which was formerly located at the Novi Expo Center. Ongoing. • Dinosaurs Unearthed is the largest dinosaur exhibition to come to Detroit, and includes 24 animatronic dinosaurs, five full-size skeletons, and nearly 40 fossil replicas and eggs from the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous periods. $11.95-$19.95. (Note: Because of financial conditions, the Detroit Science Center may be closed, so please call first.)

5020 John R, Detroit; 313-577-8400, detroitsciencecenter.org.

 

Dossin Great Lakes Museum

Bells and Whistles, Flags and Flashes: Lost Languages of the Lakes explores methods used by mariners over the years to communicate with others at sea, and people on shore. City on the Straits provides snapshots of the ways the Great Lakes and the Detroit River have influenced the region. Artifacts include wood shipping crates, an iron paddlewheel hub from The Northerner, and a Great Lakes depth chart. • Gothic Room allows visitors to experience the likes of a gentlemen’s lounge inside the City of Detroit III. The exhibit also features a window on the right side of the gallery to show the Detroit shoreline in the early 1900s. • S.S. William Clay Ford Pilot House is a Great Lakes freighter that was scrapped, but its pilot house was brought to the museum. Built in 1952, the 646-foot straight-decked vessel was lengthened to 767 feet in 1979. Also: To Scale: Great Lakes Model Ship Builders.

100 Strand, Belle Isle, Detroit; 313-833-1805, detroithistorical.org.

 

Exhibit Museum of Natural History

Archeology! Current Research in the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology is an ongoing research exhibit that examines the questions that contemporary archeologists ask about the past and the techniques they use to answer them. • The Invisible World of Mites features a large panel display and video booth featuring research done by U-M biologist Barry O Connor. •Water and You teaches water basics, and what you can do to protect this precious resource.  Admission is free, but suggested donation is $6.

University of Michigan campus, 1109 Geddes, Ann Arbor; 734-764-0478, lsa.umich.edu/exhibitmuseum.

 

Henry Ford Museum

Heroes of the Sky is a permanent exhibit focusing on adventures in early aviation. • With Liberty and Justice for All highlights four pivotal periods of history, beginning with the American Revolution and ending in the 1960s. Permanent exhibit. • Automobiles in American Life features automotive milestones, including the 15-millionth Model T, as well as the Ford Mustang. Permanent exhibit.

20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001, thehenryford.org.

 

Holocaust Memorial Center

Exhibits are dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust. Learn about World War II, the Jewish culture, religious beliefs, the postwar world, heroic rescues, and more. The center also houses a multi-lingual library. $5-$8 admission.

28123 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-553-2400.

 

 

 

MUSIC

 

 

Nashville-based country trio Lady Antebellum perform Feb.25 at The Palace of Auburn Hills.

 

Megadeth with Motorhead

Megadeth frontman Dave Mustaine has been on the hunt for revenge ever since Metallica released him from his lead guitar and co-songwriting duties with the band in 1983. Considering his target, that path doesn’t require much more than a little integrity, a dash of patience, and a few scoops of talent. Mustaine received a delicious serving of vengeance when he landed at No. 1 in the book The 100 Greatest Metal Guitarists. 6:30 p.m. Feb. 9. $13-$39.50.

Palace of Auburn Hills, 4 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 248-377-0100.

 

The Darkness

When The Darkness arrived on the scene in 2003, critics derided the band as an elaborate glam-rock send-up, or, even worse, a downright joke. But, propelled by the undeniable catchiness of the hit single “I Believe in a Thing Called Love,” The Darkness refused to fade. That is, until lead singer Justin Hawkins’ drug and alcohol abuse became no laughing matter, forcing the band’s dissolution by 2007. Yet, like all good stories of retribution, The Darkness has reunited in its original form and will stop in Detroit on a 13-date North American jaunt at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 10. $29.

St. Andrew’s Hall, 431 E. Congress, Detroit; 313-961-8137.

 

Wisaal

Part of the SoundBites series from local guitarist Steven Dearing, the Lansing-based group Wisaal has been invited to play their fusion of Arabic, klezmer, and Indian music. “SoundBites aims to feature music that exceeds the barriers of ethnic and cultural boundaries, and celebrates the diversity of metro Detroit through great music and conversation following,” Dearing explains. Price TBA. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 10.

Birmingham Unitarian Church, 38651 Woodward, Bloomfield Hills; 248-647-2380.

 

Kansas

“I set a course for winds of fortune, but I hear the voices say/Carry on, my wayward son/For there’ll be peace when you are done.” Apparently, Kansas isn’t ready to heed the words of one of its biggest hits. After 40-plus years in the business, the classic-rock radio staples refuse to be done. What’s it really matter, though, when all we are is dust in the wind? 8 p.m. Feb. 17. $25-$69.

Andiamo Celebrity Showroom, 7096 E. 14 Mile, Warren; 586-268-3200.

 

Adam Ant

Born Stuart Leslie Goddard in London, Adam Ant has experienced quite a number of professional and personal struggles in his 57 years: divorce, anorexia, betrayal by a manager, a stalker who poisoned his fish pond, nervous breakdowns, repeated trouble with the police, and multiple stays at psychiatric-treatment facilities, just to name a few. It’s an often sad story that would make a great book or biopic, but a live show ought to be just as riveting. 8 p.m. Feb. 17. $25-$35.

The Crofoot, 1 S. Saginaw, Pontiac; 248-858-9333.

 

Flogging Molly

Even though the Celtic-punk band Flogging Molly formed in Los Angeles and maintains roots in Ireland, frontman Dave King and his bandmate wife, Bridget Regan, now reside in Detroit. The band’s most recent album, 2011’s Speed of Darkness, was written and rehearsed in the couple’s basement and thematically reflects the Motor City environment at the height of its recent economic difficulties. “I wanted people who’ve lost their jobs to know I was paying attention,” King says. “We’re singing for them, all of these good people brought to their knees.” You can bet they’ll all be standing up at 7 p.m. Feb. 17. $25-$47.

The Fillmore, 2115 Woodward, Detroit; 313-961-5451.

 

Goo Goo Dolls with Steven Page

The Goo Goo Dolls might not have experienced the level of success they’ve achieved had they stuck with their original formula. Formed in the mid-1980s as “The Sex Maggots,” the group was forced to change their name by a local club owner who refused to book them because of it. At the time, they played sloppy punk rock in the vein of The Replacements, with song titles like “Up Yours” and “Had Enough.” It took years for the Goos to mellow and develop the sound that broke them into the mainstream with such hits as “Iris” and “Slide.” 8 p.m. Feb. 20. $35.

The Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, 377 Riverside Drive E., Windsor; 888-345-5885.

 

Elliott Brood

Though the moniker would suggest a solo artist, Elliott Brood is actually an alt-country band from Toronto made up of three men named Mark, Casey, and Stephen. Mark and Casey grew up together in Windsor. The trio’s first album, Ambassador, was named after the Ambassador Bridge. 8 p.m. Feb. 23. $10-$12.

The Magic Stick, 4120 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-9700.

 

Lady Antebellum with Darius Rucker

Speaking of trios whose names sound like solo artists, Lady Antebellum is a Nashville-based country band with wistful male/female harmonies and a pop sensibility that has afforded them a great deal of success, including multiple Grammy Awards for their hit single “Need You Now.” 7 p.m. Feb. 25. $29.75-$49.75.

The Palace of Auburn Hills, 4 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 248-377-0100.

 

 

THEATER

 

 

The Abreact

Frannie Shepherd-Bates directs a collection of plays humorously jabbing at the Russian comedy aesthetic. Burn the Red Banner: Or, Let the Rebels Have Their Fun is written by Michigan playwright Franco Vitalli. Feb. 3-25.

1301 W. Lafayette, Detroit; theabreact.com.

 

Bonstelle Theatre

Explore the social expectations of race and gender in the early 20th century with Intimate Apparel. This play by Lynn Nottage follows the story of an African-American seamstress living in New York and her potential choices for marriage. Feb. 10-19. $15.

3424 Woodward, Detroit; 313-557-2960; bonstelle.com.

 

Eastern Michigan University Theatre

Directed by Pirooz Aghssa, Dead Man’s Cell Phone is a comedy about a deceased man’s cell phone that won’t stop ringing and the woman who decides to answer it. Feb. 10-19. $7-$15. • No Child, by Nilaja Sun, tells the story of a teacher’s challenges working with inner-city children. Feb. 9-19. $7-$15.

103 Quirk Building, Ypsilanti; 734-481-2282; emich.edu/emutheatre.

 

Fisher Theatre

On Dec. 4, 1956, Sam Phillips gathered four of rock ’n’ roll’s biggest stars for the first and only time. Million Dollar Quartet is the Broadway musical re-creating the union of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Carl Perkins. Through Feb. 5. • In 1987, a small-town girl meets a big-city rocker in L.A.’s most famous rock club. They fall in love to the greatest songs of the ’80s in Rock of Ages. Feb. 21-26. $35-$90. • Based on the Oscar-winning movie, Shrek the Musical is a twist on the classic fairytale prince story and stars an unlikely green hero. Feb. 28-March 11.

3011 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-872-1000; broadwayindetroit.com.

 

Hilberry Theatre

When Hollywood comes to an island off the Irish coast, a local boy gets a chance at fame in The Cripple of Inishmaan. Through Feb. 4. $25-$30. • Adapted from Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand, Frank Langella’s Cyrano tells the tale of a swordsman-poet with an unfortunate nose as he uses his literary gift to woo Roxane away from her handsome love interest, Christian. Through March 10. $25-$35. • A sensuous Southern romance by Tennessee Williams, Summer and Smoke shows the emotional battle of spiritual devotion versus physical desire. Feb. 24-April 21. $30.

4743 Cass, Detroit; 313-577-2972; hilberry.com.

 

JET (Jewish Ensemble Theatre

Plot twists, self-serving agendas, and betrayal are all in David Mamet’s Race. The story, directed by Christopher Bremer, revolves around a man accused of rape, and the defense created by a small law firm. This production includes racial and sexual references, as well as provocative language. Through Feb. 19. $36-$43.

6600 W. Maple, West Bloomfield; 248-788-2900; jettheatre.com.

 

Meadow Brook

Mary Stuart is a revisionist historical commentary on the final days of Mary, Queen of Scots, who was sentenced to death by her cousin, Elizabeth I of England. This play was written by Friedrich Schiller and adapted by Peter Oswald. Feb. 8-March 4. $24-$39.

207 Wilson Hall, Oakland University, Rochester; 248-377-3300; mbtheatre.com.

 

Music Hall

Winner of three 2010 Tony Awards, FELA! is an inspiring tale of courage, passion, and love. Presented by Shawn Jay-Z Carter and Will and Jada Pinkett-Smith, it tells the true story of Nigerian musician Fela Kuti. Feb. 14-March 4. $30-$100. • The classic children’s tale explores the importance of beauty and a search for love in Corbin’s Ugly Duckling and The Tortoise and the Hare. 4 p.m., Feb. 12, $7 and $17.

350 Madison, Detroit; 313-887-8500; musichall.org.

 

Performance Network Theatre

A co-production with the Jewish Ensemble Theatre, God of Carnage is a comedy showing that maturity and polite conversation has its limits. Through Feb. 19. $25-$41.

120 E. Huron, Ann Arbor; 734-663-0681; performancenetwork.org.

 

Planet Ant

In this exploration of the American pioneer experience, a family must choose between struggling through a torturous winter in their one-room Colorado cabin or attempting to escape to the bottom of the mountain. Snowbound is directed by Kate Peckham and written by Margaret Edwartowski. Feb. 17-March 10. $20.

2357 Caniff, Hamtramck; 313-365-4948; planetant.com.

 

Purple Rose

In this tribute to fathers and sons, Agostino, a retired stone mason, is evicted from his home to make room for a new highway. He refuses to leave and his son must persuade him to let go of the house and memories. A Stone Carver is by William Mastrosimone. Through March 10. $25-$40.

137 Park St., Chelsea; 734-433-7673; purplerosetheatre.org.

 

Tipping Point Theatre

The Love List makes audiences consider the adage “Be careful what you wish for.” Bill creates a list of the 10 ideal traits in a partner. When she appears, Bill and his friends experiment with the list and watch disaster ensue. Through Feb. 19. $28-$30.

361 E. Cady St., Northville; 248-347-0003; tippingpointetheatre.com.

 

University Musical Society

Traveling Light relays the story of Motl Mendl, a young European who revolutionized cinematography in the 1900s. After becoming a famous American film director, he looks back at his early life. Directed by Nicholas Hynter, this new play by Nicholas Wright is presented by National Theatre Live. 7 p.m. Feb. 19. $12-$22.

Michigan Theatre, 603 E Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538; ums.org.

 

Send information at least nine weeks in advance to: Listings, Hour Detroit, 117 W. Third St., Royal Oak, MI 48067. By e-mail: editorial@hourdetroit.
By fax: 248-691-4531.

 

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