Arts and Entertainment



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(page 6 of 8)

MUSEUMS

 

 

Arab American National Museum

Patriots & Peacemakers: Arab Americans in Service to Our Country showcases stories of heroism and self-sacrifice that Arab-Americans have played in our country. Through June 12. Arab Civilization: Our Heritage features Arab contributions to the early world. Ongoing in the Community Courtyard. • Coming to America focuses on Arab immigrants and the culture they brought to the United States. Ongoing in Gallery 1. • Living in America exhibits early Arab-American life. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 2. • Making an Impact celebrates the stories of Arab-American athletes, organizations, physicians, labor leaders, and entertainers. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 3. $6 adults; $3 students and seniors. Under 5 free.

13624 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-2266, arabamericanmuseum.org.

 

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

Moving to His Own Beat-Fela: The Man, the Movement, the Music is an exhibit that celebrates the life and music of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. Through April 1. • Mixing Metaphors: The Aesthetic, Social and Political in African American Art is composed of more than 90 paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, sculptures and mixed-media by 36 artists. Through June 3. • The Chris Webber Collection: Exceptional People During Extraordinary Times, 1755-Present highlights rare artifacts from the personal collection of Chris Webber, native Detroiter, National Association All-Star player, and NBA announcer. His pieces reflect the lives and legacies of African-American greats such as Phyllis Wheatley, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther King Jr. • Stories in Stained Glass: The Art of Samuel A. Hodge, a series of colorful works focusing on three areas of African-American culture and history — musicians, dancers, and freedom advocates — is one of the ongoing exhibits in the Main Level Corridor. • A Is for Africa includes 26 interactive stations making up a 3-D “dictionary” designed for children. Ongoing in the Lower Level Corridor. • And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture is an evolving exhibit that recounts the 3.5-million-year-old odyssey that began in Africa and ends in Detroit. Ongoing in the Core Exhibition Gallery. • Ring of Genealogy, a work designed by local artist Hubert Massey, depicts the struggles of African-Americans in the United States. • Detroit Performs! is a photomontage dedicated to those who have called Detroit home and have gained national or international attention in the performing arts. Artists include John Lee Hooker, Aretha Franklin, Derrick May, and Kevin Saunderson. Ongoing on the Main Level. • $5-$8.

315 E. Warren, Detroit; 313-494-5800, chwmuseum.org.

 

Detroit Historical Museum

Streets of Old Detroit takes visitors back to the 19th and early 20th centuries through shop settings furnished with artifacts from the 1840s to early 1900s. • Doorway to Freedom highlights Detroit’s role as part of the Underground Railroad, the last American stop for freedom-seeking slaves before boating across the Detroit River to Canada. • Frontiers to Factories shows what Detroit was like before the advent of automobiles. See how the area changed from a trading-post settlement to a metropolis with millions of residents and factories. •Meier’s Wonderful Clock was built to demonstrate the skills of clockmaker Louis Meier Sr. Weighing 2,500 pounds, the clock stands at 15-feet high and 7-feet wide, and was shown at the Michigan State Fair in 1906 and Chicago World’s Fair in 1934. •Detroit’s Official Symbols explains symbols throughout the city, such as the city’s flag. • Glancy Trains are from the collection of Alfred R. Glancy Jr., co-owner of the Empire State Building. Also: Saying I Do: Metro Detroit Weddings, Detroit Toy Stories,  Motor City, Fabulous 5: Detroit’s Destinations, Janet Anderson, and Lorenzo Cultural Center Exhibit — 1950s: Affluence and Anxiety in the Atomic Age. New to the museum: 1914 Anderson Detroit Electric, William B. Stout, and  Boy Scouts of America — Great Lakes Council. Opening Feb. 25, Detroit Artists Market. General admission: $4-$6.

5401 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-1805, detroithistorical.org.

 

Detroit Science Center

Exhibits include a rocket laboratory, fitness-and-nutrition station, as well as a heart-health display. Also, the center offers the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America, which was formerly located at the Novi Expo Center. Ongoing. • Dinosaurs Unearthed is the largest dinosaur exhibition to come to Detroit, and includes 24 animatronic dinosaurs, five full-size skeletons, and nearly 40 fossil replicas and eggs from the Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous periods. $11.95-$19.95. (Note: Because of financial conditions, the Detroit Science Center may be closed, so please call first.)

5020 John R, Detroit; 313-577-8400, detroitsciencecenter.org.

 

Dossin Great Lakes Museum

Bells and Whistles, Flags and Flashes: Lost Languages of the Lakes explores methods used by mariners over the years to communicate with others at sea, and people on shore. City on the Straits provides snapshots of the ways the Great Lakes and the Detroit River have influenced the region. Artifacts include wood shipping crates, an iron paddlewheel hub from The Northerner, and a Great Lakes depth chart. • Gothic Room allows visitors to experience the likes of a gentlemen’s lounge inside the City of Detroit III. The exhibit also features a window on the right side of the gallery to show the Detroit shoreline in the early 1900s. • S.S. William Clay Ford Pilot House is a Great Lakes freighter that was scrapped, but its pilot house was brought to the museum. Built in 1952, the 646-foot straight-decked vessel was lengthened to 767 feet in 1979. Also: To Scale: Great Lakes Model Ship Builders.

100 Strand, Belle Isle, Detroit; 313-833-1805, detroithistorical.org.

 

Exhibit Museum of Natural History

Archeology! Current Research in the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology is an ongoing research exhibit that examines the questions that contemporary archeologists ask about the past and the techniques they use to answer them. • The Invisible World of Mites features a large panel display and video booth featuring research done by U-M biologist Barry O Connor. •Water and You teaches water basics, and what you can do to protect this precious resource.  Admission is free, but suggested donation is $6.

University of Michigan campus, 1109 Geddes, Ann Arbor; 734-764-0478, lsa.umich.edu/exhibitmuseum.

 

Henry Ford Museum

Heroes of the Sky is a permanent exhibit focusing on adventures in early aviation. • With Liberty and Justice for All highlights four pivotal periods of history, beginning with the American Revolution and ending in the 1960s. Permanent exhibit. • Automobiles in American Life features automotive milestones, including the 15-millionth Model T, as well as the Ford Mustang. Permanent exhibit.

20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001, thehenryford.org.

 

Holocaust Memorial Center

Exhibits are dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust. Learn about World War II, the Jewish culture, religious beliefs, the postwar world, heroic rescues, and more. The center also houses a multi-lingual library. $5-$8 admission.

28123 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-553-2400.

 

 

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