Arts & Entertainment



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Art

 

 

Ann Arbor Art Center

IMPRESSIONS: Selections from Stewart & Stewart, Printer/Publisher of Fine Prints, 1980 to present is on display. Through Jan. 6.

117 W. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-994-8004; annarborcenter.org.

 

The Anton Art Center

Take a virtual drive down memory lane for the Fashion and the Automobile: An Exhibit in 10 Eras. See how fashion and automotive design influenced each other in function, lifestyle, and environment, decade by decade. Jan. 7-20.

125 Macomb Place, Mount Clemens; 586-469-8666; theartcenter.org.

 

Ariana Gallery

Clothing, jewelry, ceramics, and other multidimensional pieces are on display for Trashformation. Works were made out of discarded items such as typewriters, telephones, and computers. Through Jan. 15.

119 S. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-546-8810, arianagallery.com; arianagallery.com.

 

Art Gallery of Windsor (AGW)

Kika Thorne: The WILDcraft runs through Jan. 6.

• The little-known story of the Mississauga dance tribe is told through the eyes of Robert Houle in the Paris/Ojibwa exhibition. Through Jan. 6.

Art for Canada: An Illustrated History is an ongoing exhibition featuring a changing selection of historic Canadian artwork.

401 Riverside Dr. W., Windsor; 519-977-0013, artgalleryofwindsor.com.

 

Artcite

The first show in a two-part series, 30x30 — Artcite 30th Anniversary Show features current works of 15 select artists who have previously hosted exhibitions at the gallery. Through March 2.

109 University Ave. W., Windsor; 519-977-6564; artcite.ca.

 

Artspace II

1970s Prints of Robert Motherwell illustrates how the artist used his painting techniques in the printmaking process. Jan. 1-30.

303 E. Maple, Birmingham; 248-258-1540; artspace2.com/artspace2.

 

Biddle Gallery

Made in the Mitten is the gallery’s ongoing exhibit featuring paintings, pottery, glass, jewelry, ceramics, furniture, home and fashion accessories by more than 100 Michigan artists.

2840 Biddle Ave., Wyandotte; 734-281-4779, biddlegallery.com.

 

Cranbrook Art Museum

From Here to There: Alec Soth’s America is a collective of Soth’s contemporary photography from the last 15 years, focusing specifically on his work made in the United States. Through March 30.

39221 Woodward, Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-3300; cranbrookart.edu/museum.

 

Detroit Artists Market

The DAM Design Show explores the creative process of design from all perspectives. Designers are tasked with creating functional and artistic pieces while giving an intimate look at how inspiration becomes art. Jan. 18-Feb. 16.

4719 Woodward, Detroit; 313-832-8540, detroitartistsmarket.org.

 

Detroit Institute of Arts

Fabergé: The Rise and Fall, The Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts features more than 200 precious objects from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. The show follows Carl Fabergé’s rise to fame and his relationship with the Russian aristocracy while displaying his and his workers’ spectacular work. Through Jan. 21. Exhibit fee: $15 adults, $8 youth (8-17).

Picasso and Matisse: The DIA’s Prints and Drawings showcases techniques and styles that defined much of 20th-century art. Through Jan. 6.

In the Hidden Treasures: An Experiment, visitors will vote on their favorite stories about eight works that have been in storage. Through March 3.

• Photographers from Germany, France and Detroit display their work for the Motor City Muse: Detroit Photographs, Then and Now exhibit, capturing the city’s changing landscape and culture, the auto industry, and the people of Detroit. Through June 16.

No admission fee for residents of Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties. Others: $8 adults; $6 seniors; $4 youth 6-17; under 5 free. (Special exhibit fees may apply for all residents.) 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Thur.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun.; Closed Mon.-Tue. Beginning Nov. 13, the museum will be open Tuesdays, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org.

 

Elaine L. Jacob Gallery

Utilitarian objects such as covers, containers, and supports are on display in When Art Works: African Utilitarian Objects from the Faxon Collection. The objects featured were once used in African homes, workshops, and religious shrines. Through Feb. 8.

480 W. Hancock, Detroit; 313-993-7813; art.wayne.edu/jacob_gallery.php.

 

Flint Institute of Arts

Around the World with 80 Objects features rarely seen items that transcend time and space. Through Aug. 11.

• American political cartoons in the 19th and 20th centuries are explored in Worth a Thousand Words:  American Political Cartoons. Through Jan. 6.

• Six pieces from Michael Dunbar’s collection of sculptures are on display for Explorations in Space. The meticulously crafted objects, made of bronze and steel, resemble machines waiting to be set in motion. Through Sept. 1.

Admission: $7 adults; $5 seniors; under 12 free. 12-5 p.m. Mon.-Wed. and Fri.; 12-9 p.m. Thurs.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sun.

1120 E. Kearsley St., Flint; 810-234-1695; flintarts.org.

 

Grosse Pointe Art Center

The Holiday Shop offers handmade gifts from local to international artists. ThroughJan. 7.

16900 Kercheval, Grosse Pointe; 313-821-1848; grossepointeartcenter.org.

 

Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

Famed and obscure photographs from the Second World War are on display in Memories of World War II: Photographs from the Archives of the Associated Press. View familiar scenes such as British and U.S. soldiers hitting Normandy beaches and marching through Paris on D-Day, or Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. Some images in the 126-photo collection have not been seen since the war. Through Jan. 19.

7400 Bay Road, University Center; 989-964-7125; marshallfredericks.org.

 

Toledo Museum of Art

Museum People: Faces of TMA features hundreds of headshots of community members. Through Jan. 10.

Manet: Portraying Life features about 40 portraits by Édouard Manet from 25 museums around the world. Through Jan. 1.

• An exhibit focusing on the stars, sets, and scenes created by the American film industry, Made in Hollywood: Photographs from the Kobal Foundation, is full of photographs from the major Hollywood Studios from 1920-1960. Through Jan. 20.

Leslie Adams: Drawn from Life exhibits approximately 20 works from the Toledo-based artist. Through Jan. 13.

10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thur.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.; noon-6 p.m. Sun.

2445 Monroe, Toledo; 419-255-8000, toledomuseum.org.

 

Townsend Hotel

Detroit — Put the World on Wheels: The Art of Leona Webb captures Webb’s specific understanding of Detroit through a series of photographs featuring the city’s architecture and the automobile. Jan. 7-31.

100 Townsend St., Birmingham; 248-642-7900; townsendhotel.com.

 

UMMA

African Art and the Shape of Time explores the multiplicity of time in Africa through a collection of more than 30 pieces. On display through Feb. 3. 

Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire features West’s famous painting, The Death of General Wolfe, along with multiple other depictions of General Wolfe. Through Jan. 13, 2013.

525 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-764-0395; umma.umich.edu.

 

Wayne State University Art Department Gallery

The Graduating Seniors Exhibition features various works of graduates from Wayne State University’s college of fine and performing arts. Jan. 11–Feb. 15.

150 Art Building, Detroit; 313-993-7813; art.wayne.edu/communityartsgallery.php.

 

 


Classical

 

 

Chamber Soloists of Detroit

Hear the Ehnes Quartet, featuring violinist James Ehnes, violinist Amy Schwarz Moretti, violist Richard O’Neill, and DSO Principal Cellist Robert deMaine. 3 p.m. Jan. 6. $30.

Birmingham Unitarian Church, 38651 Woodward, Bloomfield Hills; 586-944-5333; chambersoloistsdetroit.org.

 

Chamber Music Society of Detroit

• Recognized as an accomplished recitalist, chamber musician, orchestral soloist, and conductor, Anthony Marwood, violin, is accompanied by Aleksandar Madzar, playing a wide range of pieces by composers old and new, including Gordon Kerry, Beethoven, Debussy, and Schubert. 8 p.m. Jan. 12.

• Renowned for his ability to bring a fresh perspective to already well-known pieces and his interest in the works of the 19th and 20th centuries, pianist Marc-André Hamelin, performs J.S. Bach’s Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, BWV 542, Ravel’s Gaspard de la nuit, and many others. 8 p.m. Jan. 19.

Seligman Performing Arts Center, 22305 W.13 Mile, Beverly Hills; 248-855-6070; comehearcmsd.org.

 

Chamber Music at the Scarab Club

Works for flute and harp by Canada’s Marjan Mozetich share the program with pieces for cello and piano by Malcolm Forsyth and Larysa Kuzmenko, and for violin and piano by André Mathieu. 3 p.m. Jan. 27. $18-$22.

Marygrove College, 8425 W. McNichols, Detroit; 313-927-1200; scarabclub.org/chambermusic.

 

Cranbrook Music Guild

The Kontras String Quartet, composed of members from four geographic areas — Russia, South America, Japan, and the U.S. — offers a uniquely international sound with pieces from the established string-quartet canon as well as pieces from around the world. 3 p.m. Jan. 13. $25.

Christ Church Cranbrook, 470 Church Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-0097; cranbrookmusicguild.org.

 

Detroit Chamber Winds & Strings

Recently named principal trumpet of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Thomas Hooten is joined by his wife, Jen Marotta, playing both solo and duo trumpet pieces. 8 p.m. Jan. 4. $10-$22.

Hagopian World of Rugs, 850 S. Old Woodward, Birmingham; 248-646-7847; detroitchamberwinds.org.

 

Detroit Symphony Orchestra

• Detroit Symphony Orchestra Music Director Leonard Slatkin conducts Mendelssohn’s The Hebrides Overture and Piano Concerto No. 2 in D minor, along with Schumann’s Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, nicknamed the Rhenish.  7:30 p.m. Jan. 10. Tickets start at $10.

Congregation Shaarey Zedek, 27375 Bell Rd., Southfield; 248-357-5544.

 

• English conductor Mark Wigglesworth leads the DSO in Elgar’s Enigma Variations, as well as Purcell’s Chacony. Cellist Robert deMaine assumes the solo duties in Britten’s Symphony for Cello and Orchestra. 8 p.m. Jan. 19. 3 p.m. Jan. 20. $15-$100.

Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward, Detroit; 313-576-5100.

 

• In addition to Bach’s Bradenburg Concerto No. 3 in G major,  enjoy Haydn’s Concerto for Cello and Orchestra in C Major, Stravinsky’s Dumbarton Oaks, and Tchaikovsky’s Serenade in C Major for Strings. 7:30 p.m. Jan. 24. $10+.

Berman Center for Performing Arts, 6600 W. Maple Rd., West Bloomfield Township; 248-661-100.
Additional Shows:
10:45 a.m. Jan. 25. $10+. Ford Community Performing Arts Center, 15801 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-943-2350
8 p.m. Jan. 26. $10+. Kirk in the Hills, 340 W. Long Lake Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-626-2515,
3 p.m. Jan. 27. $10+. Grosse Pointe Memorial Church, 16 Lake Shore Dr., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313-882-5330; dso.org.

 

Michigan Opera Theatre

This year’s production of Too Hot to Handel, a jazz take on the Handel-composed oratorio Messiah, features the Rackham Symphony Choir and the Too Hot Orchestra. 7:30 p.m. Dec. 1. $20-$68.

Detroit Opera House, 1526 Broadway, Detroit; 313-237-SING, michiganopera.org.

 

University Musical Society

A performance by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra showcases the Frieze Memorial Organ. Conducted by Leonard Slatkin with organists Peter Richard Conte, David Higgs, and James Kibbie along with the UMS Choral Union. Pieces by Bach, Barber, Bolcom, and Khachaturian are on tap. 4 p.m. Jan. 13. $10-$75.

Hill Auditorium, 825 N. University, Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538; ums.org.

 

 

Dance

 

 

Detroit Opera House

Red, Hot and Blue, performed by the Eisenhower Dance Ensemble, electrifies the stage. 7:30 p.m. Jan. 19. $25-$45. Detroit Opera House, 1526 Broadway, Detroit; 313-237-7464.

Shen Yun is a show that brings 5,000 years of Chinese civilization to life and captures audience imagination by transporting it through regions, dynasties, and legends with ethnic and folk dances. 7:30 p.m. Jan. 24-26. 2:30 p.m. Jan. 27. $80-$180.

Detroit Opera House, 1526 Broadway, Detroit; 313-237-7464; michiganopera.org.

 

Martha Graham Dance Company

Founded in the early 20th  century, the Martha Graham troupe is one of the oldest in America. They have performed all over the world, including the Great Pyramids, and in the ancient Herod Atticus Theatre in the Acropolis. Inner Landscape showcases Graham’s psychologically probing dances, highlighting the human mind, interpersonal relationships, and the use of symbols to express human emotion. 8 p.m. Jan. 25-26. $22-$54.

Power Center, 121 Fletcher, Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538; ums.org.
 

Events

 

 

The North American International Auto Show kicks into gear Jan. 19-27 at Cobo Center.

 

The Big, Bright Light Show

Every night between 6 p.m. and midnight, 1.5 million lights will light up the buildings of downtown Rochester from the South Bridge to north of Romeo Road and from Walnut to Water Street. Through Jan. 6.

Downtown Rochester; downtownrochestermi.com.

 

The Ultimate Fishing Show

Whether you’re in the market for new lures, poles, reels, tackle, or even a new boat, you’re guaranteed to find something to tickle your fancy at The Ultimate Fishing Show. The event also includes free seminars, Shore Lunch Fish Fry, and a kids’ Trout Pond. 3-9:30 p.m. Jan. 10. 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Jan. 11. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Jan. 12. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Jan. 13. $10 adults, $4 children 6-14, 5 and under free. $5 parking fee.

Suburban Collection Showplace, 46100 Grand River, Novi; 800-328-6550.

 

Bob Saget

Comedian and actor Saget performs stand-up comedy but is most notable for his role as Danny Tanner on the show Full House. Saget was also the host of America’s Funniest Home Videos until 1997. Currently, he’s the voice of Ted Mosby as the narrator in How I Met Your Mother. 8 p.m. Jan. 18. $39.50-$55.

Royal Oak Music Theatre, 318 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-399-2980 or royaloakmusictheatre.com.

 

The North American International Auto Show

• Since its start in 1907, The North American International Auto Show has grown into an international exhibit showcasing more than 60 exhibitors. More than 5,000 journalists attended last year, 30 percent of them international. 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Jan. 19-26. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Jan. 27. $6-$12

• Before the public event, there will be a back-tie Charity Preview. Proceeds from it directly benefit a wide range of children’s charities. Since 1976, more than $87 million has been raised for southeast Michigan children’s charities. 6-9 p.m. Jan. 18. $300. (Black-tie event).

Cobo Center. 1 Washington Blvd. Detroit; 248.283.5173 or naias.com.

 

The Michigan Winter Dog Classic

More than 7,000 dogs from 160-plus breeds, educational demonstrations, obedience and conformation judging, and breed seminars make up this event. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Jan. 24. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Jan. 25-26. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Jan. 27. $8-$35. 6 and under free. $5 parking fee.

Suburban Collection Showplace. 46100 Grand River, Novi; 248-348-5600 or themichiganwinterdogclassic.com.

 

Plymouth Ice Festival

This is largest free ice sculpture display in the nation. Ice sculptures will be available for viewing 24 hours a day, weather permitting. Throughout the first day there will be several events provided by various sponsors. 2-9 p.m. Jan. 20. Runs through Jan. 22. Free.

plymouthicefestival.org.

 

Adam Carolla

Comedian, actor, and radio personality Carolla is currently best known for “The Adam Carolla Podcast,” which has set the record as most-downloaded podcast, according to Guinness World Records. 8 p.m. Jan. 25. $35.

Royal Oak Music Theatre, 318 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-399-2980 or royaloakmusictheatre.com.

 

Novi Home Improvement Show

Exhibits showcase the latest trends in kitchens, baths, windows, remodeling, and more. 2-9 p.m. Jan. 25. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Jan. 26. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Jan 27. $7-$8, 12 and under free. $5 parking fee.

Suburban Collection Showplace, 46100 Grand River, Novi; novihomeshow.com.
 


Film

 

 

Redford Theatre

• A psychotic socialite persuades a pro tennis player to take part in the theory that two complete strangers can get away with murder in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1951 flick Strangers on a Train. Starring Farley Granger and Robert Walker. 8 p.m. Jan. 4. $4, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Jan. 5. $4

• Two singers, played by Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell, travel to Paris in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. There, unbeknownst to the pair, a private detective tracks their every move. 8 p.m. Jan. 18. $4, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Jan. 19. $4

17360 Lahser, Detroit; 313-537-2560; redfordtheatre.com.

 

Michigan Theater

• The film adaptation of Michael Ende’s children’s novel, The NeverEnding Story, follows Bastian, a young boy mourning the loss of his mother; and Atreju, a young warrior from the fantasy world of Fantasia. The two set out to save Fantasia from The Nothing, a plague consuming the fantasy world and killing its empress. 1:30 p.m. Jan. 13. $8 students, seniors, & veterans, $10 adults, children 12 and under free.

Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-668-8463; michigantheater.org.

 

State Theatre

Drugs, violence and corruption plague a seemingly cheerful suburb in Blue Velvet. When Jeff returns to his hometown after his father’s stroke, he discovers a severed human ear that leads him to uncover other secrets — all leading to local crime lord Frank Booth. Midnight. Jan. 12. $7.

233 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-8667; michtheater.org/state.

 

 

Museums

 

 

Arab American National Museum

• Middle-school students of the SURA Arts Academy display their work in the 12th Annual SURA Student Exhibition in the Lower Level Gallery. Through Feb. 3.

Arab Civilization: Our Heritage features Arab contributions to the early world. Ongoing in the Community Courtyard.

Coming to America focuses on Arab immigrants and the culture they brought to the United States. Ongoing in Gallery 1.

Living in America exhibits early Arab-American life. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 2.

Making an Impact celebrates the stories of Arab-American athletes, organizations, physicians, labor leaders, and entertainers. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 3.

$6 adults; $3 students and seniors. Children under 5 free.

13624 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-2266; arabamericanmuseum.org.

 

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

• Serving as an introduction to the arrival of the Broadway play Fela!, Moving to His Own Beat – Fela: The Man, The Movement, The Music celebrates the life and music of Fela Anikupalo-Kuti. Through March 17.

• A collective sculptural show, Visions of Our 44th President, recognizes the historical significance of the first African-American U.S. president. Each artist interprets the event through a life-size, three-dimensional form. Through August 4.

Stories in Stained Glass: The Art of Samuel A. Hodge, a series of colorful works focusing on three areas of African-American culture and history: musicians, dancers, and freedom advocates, is one of the ongoing exhibits in the Main Level Corridor.

A Is for Africa includes 26 interactive stations making up a 3-D “dictionary” designed for children. Ongoing in the Lower Level Corridor.

And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture is an evolving exhibit that recounts the 3.5-million-year-old odyssey that began in Africa and ends in Detroit. Ongoing in the Core Exhibition Gallery.

Ring of Genealogy, a work designed by local artist Hubert Massey, depicts the struggles of African-Americans in the United States.

315 E. Warren Ave., Detroit; 313-494-5800; chwmuseum.org.

 

Detroit Historical Museum

• New permanent exhibits include: Doorway to Freedom: Detroit & the Underground Railroad, which tells Detroit’s role as the “doorway to freedom” in fugitive slaves’ quest to find freedom in the North.

The Allesee Gallery of Culture highlights the people, places, and events that influence our understanding of modern Detroit.

Detroit: Arsenal of Democracy documents the contributions Detroit’s industry made in World War II and also explores how the war changed the city.

• Robert Scherer and Henry Ford are just a few inventors featured in The Gallery of Innovation, an exhibit featuring Detroit innovators and the products they created that we still use today.

5401 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-1805, detroithistorical.org.

 

Dossin Great Lakes Museum

The museum is closed for renovations, but will reopen in May 2013.

100 Strand, Belle Isle, Detroit; 313-833-1805; detroithistorical.org/main/dossin.

 

Exhibit Museum of Natural History

Evolution & Health studies how the evolution of humans promoted our survival, but not our well-being. Through January 13.

Archeology! Current Research in the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology is an ongoing research exhibit that examines the questions that contemporary archeologists ask about the past and the techniques they use to answer them.

• Permanent exhibits are The Hall of Evolution, The Michigan Wildlife Gallery, The Anthropology Displays, and The Geology Displays. Free admission; suggested donation is $6.

University of Michigan, 1109 Geddes, Ann Arbor; 734-764-0478; lsa.umich.edu/exhibitmuseum.

 

Greenfield Village

The Village is closed for the winter season and will reopen April 13.

20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001; hfmgv.org/village.

 

Henry Ford Museum

Driving America is an exhibit that includes more than 100 vehicles, authentic artifacts, digital media, interactive play and personal accounts that focus on the influence the automobile has had on American culture.

Heroes of the Sky is a permanent exhibit focusing on adventures in early aviation.

With Liberty and Justice for All highlights four pivotal periods of history, beginning with the American Revolution and ending in the 1960s. Permanent exhibit.

• Developed by the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., the LEGO Architecture: Towering Ambition exhibit displays 13 large-scale, prominent architectural wonders, such as the Empire State Building, the St. Louis Gateway Arch, and the Sky Needle — made entirely of LEGO blocks. Through Feb. 24. $17 adults; $15 seniors age 62 and up; $12.50 youth; free for children 4 and under. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon.-Thur. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fri.-Sun.

Also: Dymaxion House, Presidential Limousines, Made in America, and Rosa Parks Bus.

20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001; thehenryford.org.

 

Holocaust Memorial Center

Exhibits are dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust. Learn about World War II, the Jewish culture, religious beliefs, the postwar world, heroic rescues, and more. The center also houses a multi-lingual library.  $5-$8 admission.

28123 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-553-2400; holocaustcenter.org.

 

Motown Museum

• Guided tours of the museum include The Gallery, which is composed of original stage uniforms worn by famous Motown artists, sheet music, rare photos, and other memorabilia.

Studio A, where Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross & the Supremes, and other Motown artists recorded, still contains the original instruments and equipment used during Detroit’s Motown era.

• Other attractions include Berry Gordy’s Apartment, The Echo Chamber, and Motown Style, which is home to the jeweled white glove made famous by Michael Jackson. 2648 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-875-2264; motownmuseum.com.

 


Music

 

 

Mark Cohn

This Cleveland-born crooner knew he was meant for music at a young age, when his brother’s band blasted artists like Ray Charles and The Beatles from their basement. Cohn’s latest album, Listening Booth: 1970, reimagines the songs of such influential artists as Cat Stevens and John Lennon. In 2005, Cohn was shot in the head during a carjacking. He not only survived, but was released from the hospital the next day. He certainly isn’t “The Only Living Boy in New York,” but he’s playing live “No Matter What” at 8 p.m. Jan. 14. $45 general admission, $52 reserved.

The Ark, 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-1800.

 

Simon & Garfunkel Retrospective

A chance meeting in 1991 brought together AJ Swearingen and Jonathan Beedle — and for the past decade, the pair have been performing their tribute to the venerable duo, Simon & Garfunkel. With a simple recipe of two voices and an acoustic guitar, Swearingen and Beedle revive not just the noted lullabies of this influential twosome, but also some of their lesser-known counterparts and enigmatic masterpieces. 8 p.m. Jan. 19. $22.50.

The Ark, 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-1800.

 

Underøath

This Christian metalcore band out of Tampa, Fla., has certainly seen “the changing of times.” The sextet no longer has any of its original members, and embodies a sound that has evolved right alongside the musicians. And while Underøath has a religious foundation, according to vocalist Spencer Chamberlain, “it’s not so much the backbone of our lyrics … it’s just normal life struggles.” 6 p.m. Jan. 19. $35.

The Fillmore, 2115 Woodward, Detroit; 313-961-5451.

 

Emeli Sandé

Born to a Zambian father and English mother and brought up in Scotland, this singer-songwriter put her education first, knowing that if she failed musically, she would have a career in medicine to fall back on. It’s looking as though she may not need that backup plan, after all. Sandé was featured by rapper Chipmunk in his 2009 hit, “Diamond Rings,” garnering a publishing deal with EMI and a record deal with Virgin. The 25-year-old is showing us her “version of events” at 8 p.m. Jan. 21. $17.

The Pike Room, 1 South Saginaw St., Pontiac; 248-858-9333.

 

Ed Sheeran

This English singer-songwriter-producer has been recording since 2005, breaking through commercially in 2011 with his single, “The A Team.” A philanthropist to boot, Sheeran is involved with a charity dedicated to helping prostitutes. “There’s a lot more popular charities that get a lot of attention. And with certain subjects like this, they’re often washed over,” the 21-year-old says. After collaborating with Taylor Swift on her 2012 album Red, Sheeran will appear on her “Red Tour” this year. 7 p.m. Jan. 24. $28-$35.

The Fillmore, 2115 Woodward, Detroit; 313-961-5451.

 

Fun.

After he and his first band, The Format, parted ways in 2008, lead singer Nate Ruess formed Fun with Andrew Dost and Jack Antonoff. In late winter of 2012, the band made the pop charts sizzle with the hit single, “We Are Young,” which quickly grabbed Billboard’s No. 1 spot. The group has also taken a stance against homophobia by developing “The Ally Coalition” to “raise awareness and funds to aid in the fight to LGBTQ equality.” 7 p.m. Jan. 26. Sold out.

The Fillmore, 2115 Woodward, Detroit; 313-961-5451.

 

Mariachi Vargas De Tecalitlan

Founded by Don Gaspar Vargas in 1897 in a small Mexican city, Mariachi Vargas is still going strong five generations later. This prolific group is one of the most highly regarded in the mariachi world, having recorded more than 100 albums. Come see if the self-proclaimed “Mejor Mariachi del Mundo” lives up to its name. Mariachi Vargas is performing at 4 p.m. on Jan. 27. Tickets start at $10.

Hill Auditorium, 825 N. University, Ann Arbor; 734-764-0583.

 

Soundgarden

Planting its Seattle roots in 1984, Soundgarden came of age alongside other grunge bands — Nirvana, Pearl Jam, and Alice in Chains, to name a few — and helped bring alternative rock to the mainstream in the ’90s. After separating for several years to work on other projects, including frontman Chris Cornell’s Audioslave, the group reunited in 2010 and released its latest album in November. If you think Soundgarden’s “Been Away Too Long,” come see Cornell & Co. at 7 p.m. Jan. 27. $74+.

The Fillmore, 2115 Woodward, Detroit; 313-961-5451.

 

Keane

This British rock band isn’t just another face in the crowd of alternative groups. Setting themselves apart through the use of piano rather than guitar as the lead instrument, this quartet of multi-faceted musicians has been topping the charts since 2004. Landing two spots on the list of the top 20 British albums of all time, Keane has sold more than 10 million albums. For those who are keen on Keane, take a listen live at 8 p.m. Jan. 27. $29.50+.

Royal Oak Music Theater, 318 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-399-2980.

 

Ellie Goulding

The English singer/songwriter and music producer is quite “The Writer” and is “Starry Eyed” over her new album, Halcyon. From her 2010 debut studio album, Lights, her cover of Elton John’s “Your Song” went to No. 2 in the U.K., and subsequently garnered her a performance of the tune at the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. Check out this songbird at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 28. $29.50+.

Royal Oak Music Theater, 318 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-399-2980.

 

Bobby Brown

The original bad boy and former frontman of New Edition, Mr. Whitney Houston returns with his fifth studio album, The Masterpiece. Having faced several accusations and issues over the years, including substance abuse and mental illness, Brown is attempting to stay on top after a tumultuous personal life and career. 8 p.m. Jan. 31. $33+.

Sound Board at Motor City, 2901 Grand River, Detroit; 313-309-4614.
 


Theater

 

 

The City Theatre

Conned features a quartet of professional swindlers exposing the secrets of the streets. With help from the crowd, the con men teach the audience how to avoid swindles and scams. Jan. 17-27. $76-$92.

2301 Woodward, Detroit; 313-471-3465; olympiaentertainment.com.

 

Detroit Repertory Theatre

Strapped for cash in a small Tennessee town, Alvin Moseby, a struggling photographer, begins photographing racist acts and selling them as postcards. After leaving his wife and fleeing to New York, Moseby discovers his box of postcards has followed him, tormenting his soul at every turn in Postcards. Jan. 10 -March 17. $17, $20.

13103 Woodrow Wilson, Detroit; 313-868-3686; detroitreptheater.com.

 

Fox Theatre

Join Elmo, Big Bird and the rest of the gang for Sesame Street Live: Elmo Makes Music. The fuzzy monsters of Sesame Street take to the stage to teach children about patience, acceptance, and teamwork through music. Jan. 24-Feb. 18. $12-$65.

2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-471-6611; olympiaentertainment.com.

 

Hilberry Theatre

In a suburb just outside an American city that could be Detroit, Ben and Mary invite their new neighbors over for a barbecue. The friendship forged between the two couples soon spirals out of control. Detroit explores what happens when you open yourself up to new experiences. Jan. 11-April 5. $30. 

4743 Cass, Detroit; 313-577-2972; hilberry.com.

 

JET (Jewish Ensemble Theatre)

Rosalind Franklin is on the verge of discovering the “secret” of life: the DNA double helix. Follow the driven physicist’s journey and discover how her name was left out of the history books in Photograph 51. Jan. 23-Feb. 10. $38.

6600 W. Maple, West Bloomfield; 248-788-2900; jettheatre.com.

 

Meadow Brook

In White Lies, big-shot divorce lawyer Joe White is pressured into settling down. The idea of taking on a family of his own is so frightening that Joe decides to make up a family to please his mother instead of starting one. Jan. 9-Feb. 3. $25-$40.

207 Wilson Hall, Rochester; 248-377-3300; mbtheatre.com.

 

Performance Network Theatre

A Big Band songwriter and an aspiring rock ’n’ roll star join forces to make beautiful music. But a culture clash between the two, the young woman’s secrets, and other obstacles may land one of them out on the streets in Brill, a story of rock in the late 1950s. Jan. 10-Feb. 10. $25-$41.

120 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor; 734-663-0681; peformancenetwork.org.

 

Purple Rose Theatre

The Meaning of Almost Everything, written by Purple Rose founder and The Newsroom star Jeff Daniels, questions the absurd nature of our world. Jan. 10-March 9. $25-$35.

137 Park St., Chelsea; 734-433-7673; purplerosetheatre.org.

 

Ringwald Theatre

When the Rain Stops Falling follows four generations of fathers and sons, across time and space, examining how each relates to the other. Jan. 11-28. $10-$20.

22742 Woodward, Ferndale; 248-545-5545; theringwald.com.

 

Tipping Point Theatre

Four middle-age characters are on a quest to find love in Looking. When Andy places a personal ad, he meets Val, a hopeless romantic. But things don’t go according to plan when best friends Nina and Matt have more chemistry than the blind-daters. Jan. 24-March 3. $50-$250.

361 E. Cady St., Northville; 248-347-0003; tippingpointtheatre.com.

 

University Musical Society

In The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart, our uptight, academic title character is on her way to a conference in the Scottish Borders when a snowstorm leaves her trapped in a bar full of strangers. In the secluded bar, Prudencia begins a journey of self-discovery in this National Theatre of Scotland production. Jan. 8-13.

University Musical Society; 881 N. University, Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538; ums.org.

 

Send information at least nine weeks in advance to: Listings, Hour Detroit, 117 W. Third St., Royal Oak, MI 48067. By e-mail: editorial@hourdetroit.
 By fax: 248-691-4531.  

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