The Test of Time

Bobby Laskaris’ Greek loukomades are a sweet treat — in any century


Photographs by Joe Vaughn

Bobby Laskaris at KouZina’s Greek Street Food is excited to share a Greek dessert recipe from his father (Chef Pangiotis) with Hour Detroit readers. Loukomades (Greek honey puffs) were one of Laskaris’ favorite desserts growing up as a child in a Greek home. “In the ancient Olympic Games, the athletes that won the competition received loukomades,” he says. “And I as a child, I received loukomades when I accomplished certain goals. When loukomades were made at my home, the whole neighborhood somehow, someway, knew — and would invite themselves over. It’s an ancient recipe and today it is as popular as it was during the early Olympic Games.” — Molly Abraham


Loukomades with sweet syrup, cinnamon, and walnuts (45 pieces)

Loukomades (fried dough):

¼ ounce dry yeast
½ cup lukewarm water
3 cups all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon sugar
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon whiskey, brandy, or ouzo
1½ cups lukewarm water
2 cups vegetable oil

Syrup and toppings:

2 cups sugar
1 stick cinnamon
1 cup water
½ cup Greek honey
Ground cinnamon and walnuts (optional: confectioners’ sugar and sesame seeds)


Dissolve yeast in water and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, add flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, and salt. Mix well. Add dissolved yeast, whiskey, and 1½ cups of water. Using an electric mixer, mix the batter for 3 minutes on medium-high speed, making sure there are no lumps. Cover batter with plastic wrap and set in a warm place for 2 hours to dry.

While batter is rising make syrup. Add sugar, cinnamon stick, water, and honey in a saucepan. Boil for 5 minutes until the sugar is completely dissolved.

When the batter is about double in size, heat 2 cups of oil in saucepan or frying pan until very hot but not smoking. Using 2 spoons, carefully drop 1 teaspoon full of batter for each loukomades into the oil. Turn using a slotted spoon and fry to a golden brown on each side. Remove to a plate lined with paper towel to absorb excess oil. Dip the loukomades in the warm syrup and then sprinkle with cinnamon, ground walnuts, and optional confectioners’ sugar and sesame seeds. Serve immediately. “Kali Orexi!” (good appetite).

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