Grooming for Success

With the help of local companies’ products, men can put their best faces forward


With upscale barbershops growing in popularity, a number of locally made products are hitting the market. From combs and soaps to conditioning oils and razors, here are some essential tools for men’s everyday grooming.  


1. Burton & Levy

Because of the lack of good quality combs to tame his beard, jeweler and metal artist Jason Burton started making ones for himself. He drew inspiration from past generations: The Papa David is named after his great-grandfather and The Andrew Ryan after his older brother. Cut from stainless steel in the United States, each comb is finished by hand by Burton, who combines them with leather and luxury wood material. The Papa David, $32; The Andrew Ryan, $28.


2. Cellar Door Soap & Skin

Cellar uses 100 percent plant-based oils instead of the “sodium tallowate” found in many commercial soaps. Using mineral-based pigments along with top-notch fragrance are how Cellar creates unique blends of color and distinct scents. Wood and musk are in the Dapper Dan; vanilla, licorice, and tonka beans characterize the Midnight Rider, $6 each. P.O. Box 6175, Plymouth; 313-473-0143;


3. Detroit Beard Collective

DBC uses Detroit- and Michigan-based companies and ingredients to create premium quality beard-care products. They use all natural and organic ingredients, including clove, lime, and cedarwood in their Nain Rouge conditioning oil, $15.99; Hook Beard Comb, $23.99; brush, included in kit. 313-451-4738;


4. Detroit Grooming Company

Beards being their passion, the Detroit Grooming Company’s line of products is for modern men, all the  while keeping an eye on the environment. The oils are named after popular Michigan destinations. The oils are made with sweet almond oil to maintain moisture levels of the skin and keep your beard shiny and soft. The Corktown, $21.95, is a blend of cedarwood, vanilla, and tobacco. Straight razor, $149.

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