Spring Soup Recipe from Chef Matt Tulpa

Unique dish shows off exceptional seasonal produce


Published:

“I came up with this recipe after I spent time at Blue Hill at Stone Barns in New York,” says Salt and Saffron chef/owner Matt Tulpa, who is also event chef at Stone Coop Farm in Brighton. “Exceptional produce really sings to me. There’s so much you can do with it.” Tulpa works closely with Stone Coop, growing, planning, and asking questions about what the farm is capable of. This recipe exemplifies his approach to vegetables front and center and meat as an accent. “I love to cook, serve, and eat meat,” he says. “But shifting the focus to great produce in a dish like this makes it quite unique.” 

For the broth

Ingredients 

1 large onion, peeled and roughly chopped 
1 bunch celery roughly chopped, outer stalks removed 
5 carrots, greens removed, peeled, and roughly chopped 
5 tablespoons tomato paste 
5 ham hocks
2 gallons cold, filtered water
Salt to taste

Directions
Preheat oven to 450°F. Combine onion, celery, and carrots in a roasting pan. Mix in the tomato paste with your hands until vegetables are evenly coated. Roast, stirring occasionally until vegetables are caramelized (about 1 hour). Add ham hocks and vegetables to a stock pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 6 to 8 hours. Strain broth (discard the vegetables, and reserve the ham hocks for another use). Chill and skim fat off the top. If broth is too salty, dilute with water.

For the vegetables

Ingredients 
1 ½ cup freshly shucked English peas
1 ½ cup fresh fava beans
1 ½ finely chopped leeks
3 cups spicy salad greens (arugula, mustard greens, or young kale) 
2 limes, zested, then cut into wedges 
1 bunch dill 

Directions
Prepare a bowl of ice water. Bring another pot of water to boil and blanch peas for 30 seconds. Transfer to ice water. Repeat with fava beans.
Repeat with leeks, but cook for 90 seconds. 

Assembly
Bring broth to a boil. Evenly divide vegetables between six bowls. Ladle broth into each bowl. The greens will wilt and the vegetables will warm through. Top with a pinch of lime zest, lime juice, and dill.

Note: Use any vegetables that look great at the market. In the winter, add cauliflower and lima beans.

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