Arts and Entertainment



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ART

 

 

 

Anton Art Center

Where Are They Now includes art by past student show award recipients. On display in the Petitpren Community Gallery through March 18.

Macomb County K-6 Biennial features work by Macomb County students. In the Main Gallery March 4-18.

125 Macomb Place, Mount Clemens; 586-469-8666; theartcenter.org.

 

Art Center

Inherent State features 3-D fiber artwork crossed with spoken word and poetry from two sets of sisters. Through March 18.

117 W. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-994-8004, ext. 101; annarborartcenter.org.

 

Artcite

Artist Emily Hermant showcases several hand-constructed workbenches. Through March 31.

109 University Ave. W., Windsor; 519-977-6564; artcite.ca.

 

Art Gallery of Windsor (AGW)

Art for Canada: An Illustrated History is the gallery’s ongoing exhibition featuring a changing selection of historic Canadian artwork.

• Artwork from Luanne Martineau is on display through March 25.

John Kissick: A Nervous Decade presents a 10-year survey of his work. Through March 25.

•  The Optimism of Color: William Perehudoff, A Retrospective features more than 60 works from the abstract painter. Through April 1.

401 Riverside Dr. W., Windsor, Ontario; 519-977-0013; artgalleryofwindsor.com.

 

Artspace II

Collages by Cecil Touchon are highlighted. Influenced by modernism and constructivism, the artist makes contemporary art using discarded Mexican billboard letters and numbers. March 1-31.

303 E. Maple, Birmingham; 248-258-1540; artspace2.com.

 

Birmingham Bloomfield Art Center (BBAC)

Paintings by Lulu Zheng are on exhibit in the Robinson Gallery.

• BBAC student works are on display in the DeForrest/Watson Ramp, Kantgias/de Salle, and Dr. Myron & Joyce LaBan Commons galleries. All exhibitions run through March 16.

1516 S. Cranbrook, Birmingham; 248-644-0866; bbartcenter.org.

 

Cranbrook Art Museum

No Object Is an Island: New Dialogues with the Cranbrook Collection is the first exhibit to open in the newly renovated and expanded museum. It features work from 50 leading contemporary artists and designers, as well as objects from the museum’s permanent collection of 20th- and 21st-century artwork. Through March 25. Admission: $8 adults; $6 seniors; $4 full-time students. Children under 12 free.

39221 Woodward, Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-3320; cranbrookart.edu/museum.

 

David Klein Gallery

New paintings by Betsy Eby are on display. March 17-April 14.

163 Townsend St., Birmingham; 248-433-3700; dkgallery.com.

 

Detroit Institute of Arts

Gift of a Lifetime: The James Pearson Duffy Collection showcases the varied collection of drawings, paintings, prints, sculptures, and photographs from one of Detroit’s most unconventional and respected collectors. Through March 18.

Detroit Revealed: Photographs 2000-2010 features more than 50 photographs by contemporary artists who shed light on the Motor City through their camera lens. Through April 8.

Once Upon a Time: Prints and Drawings that Tell Stories includes artwork from familiar series, portfolios, and books. Through June 24. Admission: $8 adults; $6 seniors; $4 youth 6-17; under 5 free. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Thurs.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun.; Closed Mon.-Tue.

5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org.

 

Elaine L. Jacob Gallery

Silent Watch: Contemporary Prints features artwork by 11 Finnish artists in a variety of media, from etching to silkscreen to digital. The exhibition includes works by veteran printmaker Outi Heiskanen. Through March 16.

480 W. Hancock, Detroit; 313-993-7813; art.wayne.edu.

 

Flint Institute of Arts

Witness: The Art of Jerry Pinkney highlights the artist’s journey with more than 100 illustrations and watercolors. Through April 15.

Karsten Creightney: Works on Paper features the artist’s use in various media to create images that capture the real and the imagined. Through April 29.

Captured in Glass: Historic and Contemporary Paperweights is the decorative arts gallery’s inaugural exhibition, which includes 300 works. Through June 10. Admission: $7 adults; $5 seniors; under 12 free. 12-5 p.m. Mon.-Wed. and Fri.; 12-9 p.m. Thurs.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sun.

1120 E. Kearsley, Flint; 810-234-1695; flintarts.org.

 

Grosse Pointe Art Center

Where the Wild Things Art is on display March 9-April 14.

16900 Kercheval, Grosse Pointe; 313-821-1848; grossepointeartcenter.org.

 

Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum

Artwork from Tom Phardel and Sharon Que in A Three-Dimensional Perspective is exhibited through May 26.

7400 Bay Valley, Saginaw; 989-964-7125; svsu.edu/mfsm.

 

MOCAD

Joshua White and Gary Panter’s Light Show is on exhibit through April 29.

4454 Woodward, Detroit; 313-832-6622; mocadetroit.org.

 

Oakland University Art Gallery

Idealizing the Imaginary: Invention and Illusion in Contemporary Painting showcases the work of 14 artists exploring the expansion of the imaginary and the clichés of realism. Through April 1.

208 Wilson Hall on the Oakland University campus, Rochester; 248-370-3005; ouartgallery.org.

 

Paint Creek Center for the Arts

The satirical exhibition Eye Teeth: Caustic Social Visions explores aspects of the American way of life such as the mass media, cultural differences, and capitalism. In the Main Gallery. Reception March 2, 7-9 p.m.

• The First Floor Gallery features new oil paintings, watercolors, and woodblock prints by Detroit artist Tom Humes. Both exhibitions run March 2-April 7.

407 Pine St., Rochester; 248-651-4110; pccart.org.

 

Re:View Art Gallery

Still-life work by Adam Shirley is on display through March 3.

444 W. Willis, Detroit; 313-833-9000; reviewcontemporary.com.

 

River’s Edge Gallery

Homage features 50 artists paying homage through artwork to someone who has influenced their lives and work. Through March 31. Special reception on March 16.

• Invitational art exhibition by metro Detroit artists March 20-May 11. Meet the artists night is March 30.

3024 Biddle, Wyandotte; 734-246-9880; artattheedge.com.

 

Scarab Club

Women Image Color is an invitational exhibition curated by Marilyn Zimmerman. Through March 25.

217 Farnsworth, Detroit; 313-831-1250; scarabclub.org.

 

Toledo Museum of Art

Storytelling in Miniature showcases about 140 miniature prints from the Renaissance to modern times. In the Works on Paper Galleries through March 4.

Small Worlds highlights the work of five artists who created more than 40 little worlds through relief paintings, sculptures, drawings, photographs, video, and art installations. In the Canaday Gallery through March 25.

• Expressionist and Cubist prints, illustrated books, and drawings by European artists of the 20th century are featured in Gallery 18 through March 11. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thur.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.; 12-6 p.m. Sun.

2445 Monroe, Toledo; 419-255-8000; toledomuseum.org.

 

UMMA

Recent Acquisitions: Curator’s Choice Part I is the first of a two-part exhibition introducing newly acquired works from artists such as Annie Leibovitz, Rembrandt, and others. Through March 18. Part II features modern and historic artworks from America, Europe and Asia. March 31-Aug. 5.

 • Robert Wilson: Video 50 consists of 30-second episodes of tiny dramas that highlight surreal imagery and non-linear narratives. Through April 29.

Fluxus and the Essential Questions of Life showcases the work of artists including George Brecht and Yoko Ono as they blur the boundaries between art and life. Through May 20.

Visual art by Haroon Mirza is up March 17-July 22. The installation explores the relationship between humans and the surrounding sounds created by objects, forces and actions.

525 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-764-0395; umma.umich.edu.

 

Wayne State University Art Department Gallery

Tri-County High School Exhibition runs March 2-23.

150 Art Building, Detroit; 313-993-7813; art.wayne.edu.

 

Whitdel Arts

Whitdel Arts Open Exhibition is up through March 2.

Throwback Installation Exhibition runs March 16-April 6. Reception March 16.

1250 Hubbard, Suite B1, Detroit; 313-899-2243; whitdelarts.com.

 

WSG Gallery

Of the Water showcases Marlee Hoffman’s watercolors exploring the qualities of water influenced by the elements of nature.March 1-25. 12-6 p.m. Tue.-Wed.; 12-9 p.m. Thur.-Sat.; Sun. 12-5 p.m.

306 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-2287; wsg-art.com.

 

 

CLASSICAL

 

 

Cantata Academy Chorale

Pieces from Africa, Australia, and Cuba mark the chorale’s “Travel the Globe” concert. 2 p.m. March 18. $12-$30. Central United Methodist Church.

23 E. Adams, Detroit; 313-242-7282; cantataacademy.org.

 

Chamber Music Society of Detroit

French pianist Pierre-Laurent Aimard opens the Opus 3 Piano series with Debussy’s complete Preludes, Book II, and pieces by Schumann and Kurtág. 8 p.m. March 24. $25-$75.

• New York Philharmonic players Cynthia Phelps, Nancy Allen, and Carol Wincenc create a unique collaboration of viola, harp, and flute. The performance includes works by Bach, Ibert, Ravel, and others. 8 p.m. March 31. $25-$75.

Seligman Performing Arts Center, 22305 W.13 Mile, Beverly Hills; 248-855-6070, comehearcmsd.org.

 

Cranbrook Music Guild

Named by Musical America as Musicians of the Year, David Finckel and Wu Han display their talents on piano and cello. 8 p.m. March 28. $25.

Christ Church Cranbrook, 470 Church Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-0097; cranbrookmusicguild.org.

 

Detroit Chamber Winds & Strings

A “Shining Stars” performance highlights DCWS soloists with several pieces featuring pianist James Tocco. 7:30 p.m. March 16. $10-$25. Virgil H. Carr Cultural Arts Center, 311 E Grand River, Detroit. Also at 3 p.m. March 18. $10-$25.

Birmingham Unitarian Church, 38651 Woodward, Bloomfield Hills; 248-559-2095; detroitchamberwinds.org.

 

Detroit Symphony Orchestra

An annual tribute to contributions of African-American composers and musicians, this year’s Classical Roots program features Haitian-American composer and violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain. March 16-17.

• Nicholas McGeghan conducts Mozart’s famous Prague Symphony, and pianist Robert Levin takes on the solo duties in Beethoven’s Emperor Concerto. 8 p.m. March 23.

• Former DSO Music Director Neeme Järvi returns to the podium to lead the orchestra in selections from Wagner’s Die Meistersinger and a performance of Brahms Piano Concerto No. 1, in which he is joined by pianist Hélène Grimauld. March 29 and March 31. $15-$103.50.

Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward, Detroit; 313-576-5111; detroitsymphony.com.

 

University Musical Society

If you like Brahms, this concert is right up your musical alley. Chicago Symphony Orchestra Music Director Riccardo Muti conducts his ensemble in Brahms’ mighty Symphony No. 2, then is joined by violinist Pinchas Zukerman for Brahms’ Violin Concerto. 8 p.m. March 9. $10-$100.

 • To celebrate its centennial season, the San Francisco Symphony and conductor Michael Tilson Thomas present the second American Mavericks Festival, which will be heard in only two American venues: Carnegie Hall and Hill Auditorium. Music by Copland, Harrison, Cowell, and electronica composer Mason Bates is on tap for the first of four different concerts in the festival. 7:30 p.m. March 22. $10-$75. Next up is music by Cowell, Cage, Adams, and Varèse. 8 p.m. March 23. $10-$75. The third performance is a chamber concert with music by Foss, Del Tredici, Subotnick, and a San Francisco Symphony commission from Meredith Monk. 8 p.m. March 23. $20-$42.

Rackham Auditorium, 915. E. Washington, Ann Arbor.

The final concert offers music by Ruggles and Ives, along with Morton Feldman’s Piano and Orchestra, with soloist Emanuel Ax. 8 p.m. March 24. $10-$75.

Hill Auditorium, 825 N. University, Ann Arbor; 734-763-3333, ums.org.

 

 

DANCE

 

 

Detroit Opera House

The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater returns to Detroit with new Artistic Director Robert Battle. The energetic performers present new works and timeless classics, such as Revelations. March 29-April 1. $29-$61.

• A classic children’s story book is brought to life and re-energized for an interactive performance. Children ages 4 to 11 are welcome to join Hubbard Street Dance 2’s re-creation of Harold and the Purple Crayon: A Dance Adventure. 11 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. March 3. $5-$20. 

Detroit Opera House, 1526 Broadway, Detroit; 313-237-7464; detroitoperahouse.com.

 

Eisenhower Dance Ensemble

With a program created by an array of choreographers, Red, Hot, and Blue is a journey of love, passion, and joy. 8 p.m. March 31. $20-$25.

Macomb Performing Arts Center, 44575 Garfield, Clinton Township; 586-286-2222; ede-dance.org.

 

Music Hall

Founded in 1989, Moscow Festive Ballet fuses classical elements of the Bolshoi and Kirov ballet companies to create quality classical dance. 8 p.m. March 23. $30-$50.

350 Madison, Detroit; 313-887-8500; musichall.org.

 

 

EVENTS

 

 

First Friday Experience

Kick the weekend off with a night of art, drinks, and hors d’oeuvres in downtown Northville. On the first Friday of each month, select art galleries are open late, and visitors can shop and enjoy art demonstrations. 6-9 p.m. March 2.

Downtown Northville; downtownnorthville.com.

 

The Detroit Kennel Club Dog Show

Spend time with your favorite breed, or watch them perform in competitions and demonstrations at the two-day celebration of pooches. Breeders, owners, and handlers of more than 167 breeds will be on hand.  March 3-4. $8-$15.

Cobo Center, 1 Washington Blvd., Detroit; detroitkennelclub.com.

 

313 Trivia

The Detroit Historical Society hosts 313 Trivia the first Wednesday of each month. Register as a team of three or five, or register solo and be paired with a team of players. The games feature five rounds of 10 trivia questions. Winners receive a complimentary Hard Rock Café tab for the evening, gift cards to the Hard Rock Café and two free admission passes each to the Historical Museum. Funds raised during the competition go toward the museum’s $20.1 million Past > Forward campaign. 6:30 p.m. March 7. $10.

Hard Rock Café Detroit, 45 Monroe, Detroit; pastforward.detroithistorical.org.

 

The St. Patrick’s Parade

Get your green on at the 53rd annual parade along Michigan Avenue, with Dennis Hayes serving as the grand marshal. This area is known as Corktown, and was home to many of the city’s first immigrants from Ireland, specifically from County Cork. 2 p.m. March. 11.

Starts on Michigan Avenue at Sixth Street, down to 14th Street, Detroit; detroitstpatricksparade.com.

 

Spring Boating Expo

This annual spring boat show docks here with more than 100 exhibitors displaying boats, trailers, and boating accessories.  March 15-18.

Suburban Collection Showplace, 46100 Grand River, Novi; 734-261-0123.

 

Pool & Spa Show

Swimming pools, spas, grilling, patio landscape, outdoor entertaining, and more. March 23-25.

Suburban Collection Showplace, 46100 Grand River, Novi; 800-328-6550.

 

 

FILM

 

 

Detroit Film Theatre

In A Separation, Simin and Nader must separate. Simin leaves Iran for the U.S. to give their 11-year-old daughter a better life, while Nader stays behind and hires a pious woman to care for his father, who suffers from Alzheimer’s disease. The new pairing leads to complications, as the woman’s husband doesn’t know she took the job, and an unexpected incident challenges who is to blame. March 4. $7.50 adults, $6.50 students and seniors.

• Bolshoi Ballet in HD: The Sleeping Beauty was recorded live on opening night at Russia’s Bolshoi Theatre, with the Bolshoi Ballet bringing Charles Perrault’s Sleeping Beauty to life. Choreographed by Yuri Grigorovich after Marius Petipa. March 8. $18 adults, $16 students, seniors, and DIA members.

The Conquest is the story of French President Nicolas Sarkozy’s rise to power and the strain of media, politics, and power on his life. March 9-11. $7.50 adults, $6.50 students and seniors.

• Newly married Juliet (Dita Parlo) and Jean (Jean Dasté) are separated by different paths: hers being Paris, his, the barge L’Atlante. The film L’Atalante is the love story of a couple longing to be reunited. Music by Maurice Jaubert. March 10. $5, and free for DIA members.

In The Gold Rush (restored original version), Charlie Chaplin and his pal Mack Swain are isolated in a cabin when extreme hunger sets in. Shoes begin to look like dinner, and Chaplin begins to look appetizing. This comedy is classic Chaplin, with a recorded orchestral performance of The Little Tramp’s music. March 16-18 and March 23-25. $7.50 adults, $6.50 students and seniors.

Yoshikazu Ono in a scene from Jiro Dreams of Sushi, at the Detroit Film Theatre.

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is the tale of a carnival sleepwalker whose murderous habit is controlled by the twisted Dr. Caligari. This film is a strong example of German expressionist cinema. March 17. $5, and free for DIA members.

• With costume fittings, changes, rehearsals, and auditions, Crazy Horse is a behind-the-scenes look at the Paris Crazy Horse exotic cabaret, now in its 60th year of operation, as it prepares for a new revue. March 23-25 and March 30- April 1. $7.50 adults, $6.50 students and seniors.

Rio Bravo relates the story of town sheriff John T. Chance (John Wayne), who has a murderer in his lockup, but the killer’s goons will do anything to free him. Directed by Howard Hawks. $5, and free for DIA members. March 24.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi follows 85-year-old sushi chef Jiro Ono, considered to be the world’s greatest sushi chef, on his quest for perfection while raising and mentoring his son to follow in his footsteps. March 30-April 1 and April 6-8. $7.50 adults, $6.50 students and seniors.

 • When French actor Fernandel decides to sell his mistress, a broken-down cabaret singer, she ends up with a wild hunter in an abandoned town. Harvest is a drama that tells how two opposite people become one with each other, and the land. Directed by Marcel Pagnol. March 31. $5, and free for DIA members.

5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org.

 

Redford Theatre

Clark Cable and Vivien Leigh are paired onscreen to make one of the most talked-about love stories ever made in Gone With the Wind, winner of 10 Academy Awards. March 2-4. $4.

The Three Stooges Festival brings together six episodes of head slaps, eye gouges, and nose grabs from the clumsy comedic trio: Moe, Larry, and Curly. March 9-10. $5.

The Quiet Man, starring John Wayne and Maureen O’ Hara, is a romantic comedy about a boxer who returns home to find love in Ireland. March 16-17. $4.

• It’s a Shirley Temple double feature. First, Temple tries to mend a broken relationship between her mother and Confederate grandfather in the 1935 film The Little Colonel. Then, Temple plays the ignored daughter of a rich couple in Poor Little Rich Girl. March 30-31. $5.

17360 Lahser, Detroit; 313-537-2560; redfordtheatre.com.

 

 

MUSEUMS

 

 

A replica of the  grand staircase from the Titanic exhibit, opening March 31 at The Henry Ford.
(Photograph Courtesy of The Henry Ford.)

Arab American National Museum

Patriots & Peacemakers: Arab Americans in Service to Our Country showcases stories of heroism and self-sacrifice that Arab-Americans have played in our country. Through June 12.

 • Fighting for Democracy: Who is the “We” in “We the People?” highlights the stories of seven individuals and their dedication to their country and civic engagement. Through June 10.

Arab Civilization: Our Heritage features Arab contributions to the early world. Ongoing in the Community Courtyard.

Coming to America focuses on Arab immigrants and the culture they brought to the United States. Ongoing in Gallery 1.

Living in America exhibits early Arab-American life. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 2.

Making an Impact celebrates the stories of Arab-American athletes, organizations, physicians, labor leaders, and entertainers. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 3. $6 adults; $3 students and seniors. Under 5 free.

13624 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-2266, arabamericanmuseum.org.

 

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

Moving to His Own Beat — Fela: The Man, the Movement, the Music is an exhibit that celebrates the life and music of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. Through April 1.

Mixing Metaphors: The Aesthetic, Social and Political in African American Art is composed of more than 90 paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, sculptures, and mixed-media by 36 artists. Through June 3.

• Great American Artists: Root, Branches, and Seeds — Part 1 is an exhibition of new figurative works by artists Christopher Batten, Endie Beal, Halima Cassells, and others. Though April 29.

 • The Chris Webber Collection: Exceptional People During Extraordinary Times, 1755-Present highlights rare artifacts from the personal collection of Chris Webber, native Detroiter, National Association All-Star player, and NBA announcer. His pieces reflect the lives and legacies of African-American greats such as Phyllis Wheatley, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther King Jr.

• Stories in Stained Glass: The Art of Samuel A. Hodge, a series of colorful works focusing on three areas of African-American culture and history — musicians, dancers, and freedom advocates — is one of the ongoing exhibits in the Main Level Corridor.

 • A Is for Africa includes 26 interactive stations making up a 3-D “dictionary” designed for children. Ongoing in the Lower Level Corridor.

• And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture is an evolving exhibit that recounts the 3.5-million-year-old odyssey that began in Africa and ends in Detroit. Ongoing in the Core Exhibition Gallery.

Ring of Genealogy, a work designed by local artist Hubert Massey, depicts the struggles of African-Americans in the United States.

Detroit Performs! is a photomontage dedicated to those who have called Detroit home and have gained national or international attention in the performing arts. Ongoing on the Main Level. $5-$8.

315 E. Warren, Detroit; 313-494-5800, chwmuseum.org.

 

Detroit Historical Museum

Streets of Old Detroit takes visitors back to the 19th and early 20th centuries through shop settings furnished with artifacts from the 1840s to early 1900s.

Doorway to Freedom highlights Detroit’s role as part of the Underground Railroad, the last American stop for freedom-seeking slaves before boating across the Detroit River to Canada.

Frontiers to Factories shows what Detroit was like before the advent of automobiles. See how the area changed from a trading-post settlement to a metropolis with millions of residents and factories.

Meier’s Wonderful Clock was built to demonstrate the skills of clockmaker Louis Meier Sr. Weighing 2,500 pounds, the clock stands at 15-feet high and 7-feet wide, and was shown at the Michigan State Fair in 1906 and Chicago World’s Fair in 1934.

Detroit’s Official Symbols explains symbols throughout the city, such as the city’s flag.

Glancy Trains are from the collection of Alfred R. Glancy Jr., co-owner of the Empire State Building. Also: Saying I Do: Metro Detroit Weddings, Detroit Toy Stories, Motor City, Fabulous 5: Detroit’s Destinations, Janet Anderson, and Lorenzo Cultural Center Exhibit — 1950s: Affluence and Anxiety in the Atomic Age. New to the museum: 1914 Anderson Detroit Electric, William B. Stout, Boy Scouts of America — Great Lakes Council, and Detroit Artists Market. General admission: $4-$6.

5401 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-1805, detroithistorical.org.

 

Dossin Great Lakes Museum

Bells and Whistles, Flags and Flashes: Lost Languages of the Lakes explores methods used by mariners over the years to communicate with others at sea, and people on shore.

City on the Straits provides snapshots of the ways the Great Lakes and the Detroit River have influenced the region. Artifacts include wood shipping crates, an iron paddlewheel hub from The Northerner, and a Great Lakes depth chart.

Gothic Room allows visitors to experience the likes of a gentlemen’s lounge inside the City of Detroit III. The exhibit also features a window on the right side of the gallery to show the Detroit shoreline in the early 1900s.

S.S. William Clay Ford Pilot House is a Great Lakes freighter that was scrapped, but its pilot house was brought to the museum. Built in 1952, the 646-foot straight-decked vessel was lengthened to 767 feet in 1979. Also: To Scale: Great Lakes Model Ship Builders.

100 Strand, Belle Isle, Detroit; 313-833-1805, detroithistorical.org.

 

Exhibit Museum of Natural History

Archeology! Current Research in the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology is an ongoing research exhibit that examines the questions that contemporary archeologists ask about the past and the techniques they use to answer them.

The Invisible World of Mites features a large panel display and video booth featuring research done by U-M biologist Barry O Connor

Water and You teaches water basics, and what you can do to protect this precious resource.  Admission is free, but suggested donation is $6.

University of Michigan campus, 1109 Geddes, Ann Arbor; 734-764-0478, lsa.umich.edu/exhibitmuseum.

 

Henry Ford Museum

Driving America includes more than 100 vehicles, authentic artifacts, digital media, interactive play, and personal accounts that focus on the influence the automobile has had on American culture.

Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition is a 10,000-square-foot display that features more than 300 artifacts, 250 of which have never been shown in Michigan. Opens March 31.

With Liberty and Justice for All highlights four pivotal periods of history, beginning with the American Revolution and ending in the 1960s. Permanent exhibit.

Automobiles in American Life features automotive milestones, including the 15-millionth Model T, as well as the Ford Mustang. Permanent exhibit.

20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001, thehenryford.org.

 

Holocaust Memorial Center

Exhibits are dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust. Learn about World War II, Jewish culture, religious beliefs, the postwar world, heroic rescues, and more. The center also houses a multi-lingual library. $5-$8 admission.

28123 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-553-2400.

 

 

MUSIC

 

 

Mutemath

In the tradition of YouTube darlings OK Go, Mutemath initially reached a wider audience through a painstakingly choreographed music video. The New Orleans-based alternative rock quartet were filmed playing their first single, “Typical,” backward, an undertaking that took three weeks to pull off. Mutemath’s third album, Odd Soul, was released in October and delves into the members’ eccentric Christian upbringing, while further exploring elements of Zeppelin-esque psychedelia and garage rock. 7 p.m. March 2. $40.

St. Andrew’s Hall, 431 E. Congress, Detroit; 313-961-8137.

 

The Black Keys & Arctic Monkeys

Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney, the blues revival duo who comprise the Black Keys, have come a long way from Carney’s Akron, Ohio, basement where they recorded their debut album, The Big Come Up, in 2001. Having since moved to Nashville, the duo released the Grammy Award-winning album Brothers (Best Alternative Music Album), and sold out Madison Square Garden in 15 minutes. Talk about a big come-up. 8 p.m. March 3. $76-$92 and up.

Joe Louis Arena, 600 Civic Center Dr., Detroit; 313-983-6606.

 

Hot Tuna

Keeping track of all the acts that resulted from the splintering of Jefferson Airplane can be a daunting task. What’s the difference between Jefferson Starship and Starship? No matter. Hot Tuna’s story is pretty simple: Two original Airplane members started playing traditional blues songs during their main band’s hiatus in 1969. And while Hot Tuna has gone through its own share of starts and stops over the last four decades, the band is currently undergoing a period of solid activity, having released its first album in 20 years last April. 8 p.m. March 6. $35.

The Ark, 316 S Main, Ann Arbor; 734-761-1800.

 

Gomez

Don’t worry, Justin Bieber, your girl hasn’t dropped the “Selena” to join the single-named diva club populated by Madonna and Cher. Rather, Gomez is a versatile rock group made up of five unassuming English chaps who have been playing together since Alex Russo was in diapers (1997). In addition to traditional instruments, three of the members of Gomez share vocal duties, and four write songs. You’d think so much back-and-forth would cause tension, but the band’s members have remained consistent since forming in 1996. (Pay attention, Jefferson Starship.) 7 p.m. March 8. $29.

St. Andrew’s Hall, 431 E. Congress, Detroit; 313-961-8137.

 

Kelly Clarkson

Clarkson hardly needs an introduction since winning the inaugural season of American Idol. The Texan singer’s name has since been cemented in pop culture history, as a replacement expletive for Steve Carell’s character during the famous chest-waxing scene in The 40-Year-Old Virgin. The shrill chanting of “Kelly Clarkson” takes on a more straightforward meaning at 8 p.m. March 8. $110.96-$127.91.

The Colosseum at Caesers Windsor, 377 Riverside Drive East, Windsor; 888-345-5885.

 

Barry Manilow

If you’ve ever been on a Caribbean cruise, you’ve likely witnessed Manilow’s hit, “Copacabana (At the Copa),” performed by an overweight Hawaiian-shirted karaoke singer during the Bon Voyage celebration. The only chance of changing your association with that song is seeing the original songwriter perform it himself. It’s for your own good. 7:30 p.m. March 9. $44-$240.

The Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-961-5451.

 

Anti-Flag

The question always comes up with this band’s name: “That’s not anti-the-American-flag, is it?” Frontman Justin Sane says the moniker came in response to “goons” sporting American flag jackets who came to the band’s early shows just to beat up on one another. But with album names like Die for Your Government and North America Sucks, the band’s anti-capitalist sentiment shines through its conspicuous nickname. Now if only Sane could explain how a band with such anti-corporate views could sign a record deal with RCA. … 7 p.m. March 12. $15.

The Majestic Theatre, 412 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-9700.

 

Badfish – A Tribute to Sublime

There’s nothing like making a lot of money off someone else’s art. Just ask the countless Beatles tribute bands. Badfish, originally composed of four computer-science majors at the University of Rhode Island, might be in a field of their own, having grossed $1.4 million in 2006 alone. It turns out, there is still quite an audience for Sublime’s music, even 16 years after lead singer Bradley Nowell’s death. 8 p.m. March 16. $19.

St. Andrew’s Hall, 431 E. Congress, Detroit; 313-961-8137.

 

Kenny Rogers

In his last two trips to the area, Rogers has played the Fox Theatre for his annual “Christmas & Hits” tour. And while you might spot Rogers look-a-likes everywhere (just visit menwholooklikekennyrogers.com for evidence), this year, Windsor takes its turn as Mr. Roger’s neighborhood at 9 p.m. March 17. $32-$77.

The Colosseum at Caesers Windsor, 377 Riverside Dr. East, Windsor; 888-345-5885.

 

Boyz II Men

The boys who reached R&B stardom in the 1990s have now certainly become men. This is symbolized by their latest album, Twenty, a 20th-anniversary set featuring 13 new songs and eight classic B2M songs re-recorded. Perhaps it’s time the Boyz flipped their moniker. Then again, perhaps they shouldn’t. 8 p.m. March 22. $175.

Sound Board at MotorCity Casino Hotel, 2901 Grand River, Detroit; 313-237-7711.

 

Burton Cummings

Cummings is perhaps best known as the lead singer of the now-defunct Canadian rock band The Guess Who. As the story goes, guitarist Randy Bachman (who later went on to form Bachman-Turner Overdrive) broke a string during a set at a curling rink in Ontario. He started playing a riff that the audience seemed to enjoy, and after Cummings ran out of guitar solos, Bachman instructed him to sing something. Out of the blue, Cummings blurted out, “American woman, stay away from me!” And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how a No. 1 record is born.9 p.m. March 23. $37.51-$82.71.

The Colosseum at Caesers Windsor, 377 Riverside Dr. East, Windsor; 888-345-5885.

 

The O’Jays

While the O’Jays earned a spot at the forefront of Philadelphia soul, their origins are a little closer to Motown — in Canton, Ohio, to be exact. Since their inception in 1958, the R&B legends’ journey has had many stops, including an induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and a lifetime achievement award from BET. That’s what the ride is like aboard the “Love Train.” 9 p.m. March 31. $43.16 - $77.06.

The Colosseum at Caesers Windsor, 377 Riverside Dr. East, Windsor; 888-345-5885.

 

 

THEATER

 

 

Fisher Theatre

Based on the Oscar-winning movie, Shrek the Musical is a twist on the classic fairy-tale prince story and stars an unlikely hero. Through March 11.

3011 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-872-1000; broadwayindetroit.com.

 

Fox Theatre

 Love is challenged by war and prejudice in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s South Pacific, featuring such songs as “Some Enchanted Evening,” “Bali Ha’i,” and “Younger Than Springtime.” Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Tales of the South Pacific, by James Michener, two couples living on an island feel the effects of World War II and the strain of differing opinions. March 2-4. $30-$70.

2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-471-3200; olympiaentertainment.com.

 

Hilberry Theatre

 Adapted from Cyrano de Bergerac, by Edmond Rostand, Frank Langella’s Cyrano follows a swordsman-poet with an unfortunate nose as he uses his literary gift to woo Roxane from the handsome Christian. Through March 10. $25-$35.

• A sensuous Southern romance by Tennessee Williams, Summer and Smoke shows the emotional battle of spiritual devotion versus physical desire. Through April 21. $30.

4743 Cass, Detroit; 313-577-2972; hilberry.com.

 

The Jewish Ensemble Theatre (JET)

Dysfunctional would be an understatement in describing Brenda’s family. This true story starts with Brenda’s mother being shot by her father, and then his marriage to her mother’s sister after his release from jail. My Brooklyn Hamlet, directed by Brenda Adelman, explores a daughter’s challenge of forgiving the unforgivable. March 3-4. $36-$43.

Aaron DeRoy Theatre, 6600 W. Maple, West Bloomfield; 248-788-2900; jettheatre.com.

 

Meadow Brook

Mary Stuart is a revisionist historical commentary on the final days of Mary, Queen of Scots. She was sentenced to death by her cousin Elizabeth I of England. This play was written by Friedrich Schiller and adapted by Peter Oswald. Through March 4. $24-$39.

• When members of a retirement community decide to use their money to help less fortunate members of the area, their children, hungry for inheritance, step in to stop them. Spreading It Around pits family versus charity.March 14-April 8. $24-$39.

207 Wilson Hall, Oakland University, Rochester; 248-377-3300; mbtheatre.com.

 

Music Hall

Winner of three 2010 Tony Awards, FELA! is an inspiring tale of courage, passion, and love. Presented by Shawn Jay-Z Carter and Will and Jada Pinkett-Smith, it tells the true story of Nigerian musician Fela Kuti. Through March 4. $30-$100.

• When a young girl struggles to fit in with her classmates, it challenges her friendships, confidence, and ability to stand up for herself in The Hundred Dresses. 2 p.m. March 24. $7, $17.

350 Madison, Detroit; 313-887-8500; musichall.org.

 

Performance Network Theatre

Experience the dark side of American history with this Western story of revenge. Filled with dark humor, Dead Man’s Shoes is directed by David Wolber. March 8-April 8. $25-$41.

120 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor; 734-663-0681; performancenetwork.org.

 

Planet Ant

 In this exploration of the American pioneer experience, a family must choose between struggling through a torturous winter in their one-room Colorado cabin or attempting to escape to the bottom of the mountain. Snowbound is directed by Kate Peckham and written by Margaret Edwartowski. Through March 10. $20.

2357 Caniff, Hamtramck; 313-365-4948; planetant.com.

 

Purple Rose

In this tribute to fathers and sons, Agostino, a retired stonemason, is evicted from his home to make room for a new highway. He refuses to leave and his son must persuade him to let go of the house and his memories. A Stone Carver is by William Mastrosimone. Through March 10. $25-$40.

In White Buffalo, a small-town family’s life is interrupted when the birth of a white buffalo calf brings a flood of spiritual followers. White buffaloes symbolize peace on earth and unity to mankind in Sioux tradition. March 29-June 2. $25-$40.

137 Park St., Chelsea; 734-433-7673; purplerosetheatre.org.

 

Tipping Point Theatre

Married writers Linda and Michael begin keeping journals after Linda is diagnosed with cancer. Trouble arises when she wants to read Michael’s entries and finds something she doesn’t expect — but are the entries true? Fiction is written by Steven Dietz. March 15-April 15. $28-$30.

361 E. Cady St., Northville; 248-347-0003; tippingpointetheatre.com.

 

University of Detroit Mercy

 Many intimate conversations happen in the confines of a vehicle in Autobahn, which follows a series of conversations centered on addiction, adultery, and paranoia from a front-seat point of view. March 23-25 and March 30-April 1. $9-$18.

8425 W. McNichols, Detroit; 313-993-3270; liberalarts.udmercy.edu.

 

University Musical Society

In The Andersen Project: Ex Machina, a comedian is asked by the Opera Garnier to write a libretto for a children’s opera. His rented apartment above a peep show in the red-light district and the works of Hans Christian Andersen influence his writing. March 15-17. $18-$48.

Power Center, 121 Fletcher, Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538; ums.org.

 

Send information at least nine weeks in advance to:

Listings, Hour Detroit, 117 W. Third St., Royal Oak, MI 48067.

By e-mail: editorial@hourdetroit.


By fax: 248-691-4531.


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