Arts & Entertainment



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Art

 

 

Ariana Gallery

Ariana Gallery: Whimsical animal-themed jewelry designs by Link Wachler, figurative ceramic sculptures by Pamela Day, paintings by Jack Kevorkian, graffiti art by Sinister, and repurposed sculptures by Ronald Stawisz are on display.

119 S. Main St., Royal Oak; 248-546-8810, arianagallery.com; arianagallery.com.

 

Artcite

A is for… is Amin Rehman’s solo show in which he explores neo-colonialism. Alternating between oil and canvas and neon signs, Rehman uses short texts to evoke global realities and personal experiences. Oct. 19 through Nov 24.

109 University Ave. W., Windsor; 519-977-6564; artcite.ca.

 

Art Gallery of Windsor (AGW)

Art for Canada: An Illustrated History is the gallery’s ongoing exhibition featuring a changing selection of historic Canadian artwork.

401 Riverside Dr. W., Windsor, Ontario; 519-977-0013; artgalleryofwindsor.com.

 

Artspace II

An oil painting exhibit by Esteban Chavez, featuring his interpretation of various Detroit landmarks.

303 E. Maple, Birmingham; 248-258-1540; artspace2.com/artspace2.

 

Belian Art Center

• Paintings by Georg Vihos are on display from through mid November.

• Functional and decorative pottery designs by Zabel Belian are on exhibit.

5980 Rochester Rd., Troy; 248-828-1001, belianart.com.

 

Biddle Gallery

Made in the Mitten is the gallery’s ongoing exhibit featuring paintings, pottery, glass, jewelry, ceramics, furniture, home and fashion accessories by more than 100 Michigan artists.

2840 Biddle Ave., Wyandotte; 734-281-4779, biddlegallery.com.

 

Cranbrook Art Museum

George Nelson: Architect, Writer, Designer, Teacher is an exhibit with more than 120 3-D works and 50-plus historical documents by one of the most influential American designers of the 20th century. Through Oct. 14.

39221 Woodward, Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-3300; cranbrookart.edu/museum.

 

Brown and Juanita C. Ford Art Gallery

Urbane Construction, a collection of Allie McGhee’s large, expressive paintings. Through Nov. 17. 

1001 W. Fort St., Detroit; 313-496-2634, wcccd.edu/about/gallery_history.htm.

 

David Klein Gallery

Best known for her project Bodyshop, performing artist, Cranbrook instructor, and photographer Liz Cohen displays her work. Nov. 3-Dec. 8.

163 Townsend, Birmingham; 248-433-3700, dkgallery.com.

 

Detroit Artists Market

Art for the Holidays, the annual sales market with something to appeal to almost every taste.  Nov. 9-Dec. 22.

4719 Woodward, Detroit; 313-832-8540, detroitartistsmarket.org.

 

Detroit Institute of Arts

Fabergé: The Rise and Fall, The Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts features more than 200 precious objects from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. The show follows Carl Fabergé’s rise to fame and his relationship with the Russian aristocracy while displaying his and his workers’ spectacular work. Through Jan. 21. Exhibit fee: $15 adults, $8 youth (8-17).

Picasso and Matisse: The DIA’s Prints and Drawings showcases techniques and styles that defined much of 20th-century art. Through Jan. 6. Admission: $8 adults; $6 seniors; $4 youth 6-17; under 5 free. (No admission for tri-county residents.) 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Thurs.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun.; Closed Mon.-Tue.

In the Hidden Treasures: An Experiment, visitors will vote on their favorite stories about eight works that have been in storage. Through March 3.

No admission fee for residents of Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties. Others: $8 adults; $6 seniors; $4 youth 6-17; under 5 free. (Special exhibit fees may apply for all residents.) 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Thur.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun.; Closed Mon.-Tue. Beginning Nov. 13, the museum will be open Tuesdays, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org.

 

Flint Institute of Arts

• The 300 finalists from an international cartoon competition are featured in Drawing Together: International Cartoons. The cartoons were drawn to instill tolerance and alleviate discrimination among young people and adults alike. Through Dec. 30. Admission: $7 adults; $5 seniors; under 12 free. 12-5 p.m. Mon.-Wed. and Fri.; 12-9 p.m. Thurs.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sun.

Around the World with 80 Objects features rarely seen items that transcend time and space. Through Aug. 11.

• American political cartoons in the 19th and 20th centuries are explored in Worth a Thousand Words:  American Political Cartoons. Nov. 3-Jan. 6.

Admission: $7 adults; $5 seniors; under 12 free. 12-5 p.m. Mon.-Wed. and Fri.; 12-9 p.m. Thurs.; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sun.

1120 E. Kearsley St., Flint; 810-234-1695; flintarts.org.

 

Grosse Pointe Art Center

The Holiday Shop offers handmade gifts from local to international artists. Nov. 11-Jan. 7.

16900 Kercheval, Grosse Pointe; 313-821-1848; grossepointeartcenter.org.

 

Lawrence Street Gallery

The paintings of Agnes Miller are on display through November.

22620 Woodward, Ferndale; 248-544-0394; lawrencestreetgallery.com.

 

MOCAD

Vision in a Cornfield, a large-scale collaboration uniting a band, an urban arts group, and an art collective, is on display. Through Dec. 30.

4454 Woodward, Detroit; 313-832-6622, mocadetroit.com.

 

Re:View Art Gallery

Re:Collect 2012, a group exhibit, is up from Nov. 10 through Dec. 22.

444 W. Willis, Detroit; 313-833-9000; reviewcontemporary.com.

 

Robert Kidd Gallery

Rick Vian showcases his New Work. Nov. 10-Dec. 15.

107 Townsend, Birmingham; 248-642-3909, robertkiddgallery.com.

 

Toledo Museum of Art

Museum People: Faces of TMA features hundreds of headshots of community members. Through Jan. 10.

Manet: Portraying Life features about 40 portraits by Édouard Manet from 25 museums around the world. Through Jan. 1.

• An exhibit focusing on the stars, sets, and scenes created by the American film industry, Made in Hollywood: Photographs from the Kobal Foundation, is full of photographs from the major Hollywood Studios from 1920-1960. Through Jan. 20.

Leslie Adams: Drawn from Life exhibits approximately 20 works from the Toledo-based artist. Through Jan. 13.

10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thur.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Fri.; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat.; noon-6 p.m. Sun.

2445 Monroe, Toledo; 419-255-8000, toledomuseum.org.

 

323 East

Glass, Cinder & Thorns II curated by April Segedi is the all-women, fairy-tale inspired group exhibition, originally featured at the gallery in 2009. Closes Nov. 17.

323 E. Fourth, Royal Oak; 248-246-9544; 323east.com.

 

UMMA

• Jesper Just, the Danish artist, showcases his installation This Nameless Spectacle. Through Dec. 9.

• Work by the Seoul-based art collaborative Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries, which uses innovative multimedia techniques, is on display through Nov. 18.

African Art and the Shape of Time explores the multiplicity of time in Africa through a collection of more than 30 pieces. On display through Feb. 3. 

Benjamin West: General Wolfe and the Art of Empire features West’s famous painting, The Death of General Wolfe, along with multiple other depictions of General Wolfe. Through Jan. 13, 2013.

525 S. State St., Ann Arbor; 734-764-0395; umma.umich.edu.
 


Classical

 

 

Brunch with Bach

Prokofiev’s 1936 composition with narration, Peter and the Wolf, is this month’s offering. 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Nov. 18. $35 for brunch and concert; $20 for continental breakfast and concert; $15 concert only.

In the Kresge Court at the Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-7900, dia.org.

 

Chamber Music Society of Detroit

Clarinetist Richard Stoltzman and pianist David Deveau join the Linden String Quartet in a performance of Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet. Also on the program: Bernstein’s Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, Beethoven’s String Quartet in C minor, Op. 18, No. 4, and Sculthorpe’s Songs of the Sea and Sky. 8 p.m. Nov. 17. $30.

Seligman Performing Arts Center, 22305 W.13 Mile, Beverly Hills; 248-855-6070; comehearcmsd.org.

 

Cranbrook Music Guild

Tenor Jonas Hacker, a voice student at the University of Michigan and CMG’s Betty Brewster scholarship winner, performs a solo recital, including Schumann’s Dichterliebe and songs by Schubert and Beethoven. 3 p.m. Nov. 11. $25.

Christ Church Cranbrook, 470 Church Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-0097; cranbrookmusicguild.org.

 

Detroit Chamber Winds & Strings

The group’s 31st season kicks off with pieces by Beethoven, Hummel, Mozart, Dvorak, Swendsen, Maurer, and others. 4 p.m. Nov. 4. $10-$25.

The Community House, 380 S. Bates, Birmingham; 248-559-2098, detroitchamberwinds.org.

 

Detroit Symphony Orchestra

• Music Director Leonard Slatkin leads the forces in Copland’s Rodeo and Rachmaninov’s Symphony No. 1. In addition, bassoonist Robert Williams takes the solo duties in John Williams’ The Five Sacred Trees: Concerto for Bassoon and Orchestra. Nov. 9-11.

• Sir Andrew Davis picks up the baton to lead the orchestra in two stylistically diverse works: Debussy’s Images and Bach’s Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor. Sandwiched between these pieces is Schumann’s Piano Concerto in A minor, with Andrew von Oeyen at the keyboard. Nov. 16-18.

• Joyce Yang tackles the solo duties in Rachmaninov’s evergreen Piano Concerto No. 2, which is bookended by Khachaturian’s Suite from Masquerade and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 2. Peter Oundjian conducts. Nov. 29-30. $15-$100 for all concerts.

Orchestra Hall, 3711 Woodward, Detroit; 313-576-5111; dso.org.

 

Michigan Opera Theatre

• The second opera in MOT’s 42nd season is a company premiere, even though the opera dates from 1724. Handel’s Baroque masterpiece, Julius Caesar, features countertenors David Daniels and David Trudgen taking turns in the title role and Lisette Oropesa and Adrianna Chuchman alternating in the role of Cleopatra. Though the opera is almost 300 years old, MOT says it will be “reimagined as a glamorous Hollywood classic.” Howard Arman conducts. Nov. 10-18. $25-$125.

Detroit Opera House, 1526 Broadway, Detroit; 313-237-SING, michiganopera.org.

 

Pro Musica

• Violinist Ray Chen performs a solo recital with musical numbers to be announced. 8:30 p.m. Nov. 9. Tickets start at $45.

In the Music Box Theatre at the Max Fisher Music Center, 3711 Woodward, Detroit; 313-576-5111.

 

University Musical Society

• The Belcea Quartet, founded in England in 1994, is taking on the 16 Olympian string quartets by Beethoven — in stages, of course. Ann Arbor audiences can hear two of these masterpieces, dating from 1825: The Quartet in E-Flat Major, Op. 127 and the Quartet in B-Flat Major, Op. 130. 4 p.m. Nov. 11. $22-$46.

St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, 2250 E. Stadium Blvd., Ann Arbor; ums.org.

 

Vivace Music Series

The young cellist Erik Ásgeirsson appears with pianist Pauline Martin in a recital of works by Fauré, Brahms, Shostakovich, and Rossini-Tedesco. An afterglow follows the concert. 8 p.m. Nov. 3. $20.

Birmingham Temple, 28611 W. 12 Mile Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-788-9338, vivaceseries.org.
 


Dance

 

 

Bellydance Superstars

This wiggling, shaking, and gyrating American troupe has spread the art of belly-dancing to 25 countries and countless cities. Now it’s Detroit’s turn to see these exotic dancers. 8 p.m. Nov. 11. $27-$47.

Music Hall, 350 Madison, Detroit; 313-887-8501, musichall.org.

 

BalletMet Columbus

Tchaikovsky’s beloved holiday chestnut, The Nutcracker, gets a jump-start on the holidays, performed just after Thanksgiving. More than 100 performers from BalletMet Columbus, along with several local children, will take part in the spectacle. Unlike many ballets, which include recorded music, these performances will be accompanied by the Michigan Opera Theatre Orchestra.

Nov. 23-25. 25-$125. Detroit Opera House, 1526 Broadway, Detroit; 313-237-SING, michiganopera.org.
 

Events

 

 

First Friday Experience:

Explore everything downtown Northville has to offer as it hosts this event the first Friday of every month.  Participating galleries will have special exhibits and featured artists present. Also, select shops are open late and will serve refreshments, feature live music, and hold special sales. 6-9 p.m. Oct. 5.

Downtown Northville; downtownnorthville.com.

 

Disney’s Phineas and Ferb

Your favorite gang made an escape from the TV screen and have landed right in metro Detroit. Perry, the pet platypus, shifts to his secret double life as Agent P to foil another one of Dr. Doofenshmirtz’s evil plans in this high-energy, part action adventure, part rock-concert production. Nov. 2 and 4. $19-$40.

Palace of Auburn Hills, 4 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 800-745-3000.

 

2012 Kellogg’s Tour of Gymnastics Champions

Nastia Liukin, the 2008 Olympic all-around champion, leads members of the men’s and women’s 2012 Olympic gymnastic teams and local gymnasts through a challenging course that pairs athleticism with performance art. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 3. $25-$75.

Palace of Auburn Hills, 4 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 800-745-3000.

 

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey’s Fully Charged

You’ve heard of a human cannonball, but how about a flaming human arrow shot from a giant crossbow? “Fully Charged” harks back to the traditions of acrobatics and dare-devilry that earned it the title of “The Greatest Show on Earth.” Nov. 7-11. $13-$82.

Palace of Auburn Hills, 4 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 800-745-3000.

 

Kathy Griffin

The redhead comedian is famously candid and unrelenting in her takedowns of Hollywood A-list celebrities. She’s also a two-time Emmy winner for her Bravo reality show, Kathy Griffin: My Life on the D-List, a New York Times bestselling author, and a three-time Grammy Award nominee. 8 p.m. Nov. 9. $49-$76.

Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-983-6000.

 

Holiday Tables

The display, on the first floor of Cranbrook House, offers inspiration for holiday entertaining. Nov. 15-18.

Cranbrook House, 380 Lone Pine Rd., Bloomfield Hills; 248-645-3149, cranbrook.edu/housegardens.

 

Detroit Christmas Tree Lighting

The official kickoff of the holiday season in the heart of Detroit features live music, ice-skating performances, and open skate for attendants. Festivities begin an hour and a half before the tree is lit at 8 p.m. Nov. 16.

Campus Martius Park; campusmartiuspark.org.

 

Hob Nobble Gobble

Enjoy dinner, live entertainment, food, carnival midway games, and rides. Proceeds benefit The Parade Company. Nov. 16.

Ford Field, 2000 Brush, Detroit; theparade.org.

 

Lewis Black

Lewis Black has nabbed a couple of Grammys, both in the category of Best Comedy Album. He is a famously cynical and passionate stand-up who rose to fame with his colorful and often biting commentary on Comedy Central’s The Daily Show. 8 p.m. Nov. 16. $46-$86.

Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-983-6000.

 

Great Lakes Art Fair

The bi-annual indoor art fair, featuring fine artists from throughout the region, has more than doubled its attendance since its 2009 inception. Nov. 16-18. $7.

Suburban Collection Showplace, Hall A, 46100 Grand River Ave., Novi; greatlakesartfair.com.

 

Festival of Trees

Entering its 28th year, this annual event is one of the largest fundraisers for the Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation. The eight-day festival features individually designed trees, wreaths, gingerbread houses, Christmas stockings, and more. The black-tie preview party will be held on Nov. 17 ($25-$75), and tree-lighting on Nov. 20. Nov. 17-25. $3-$5.

Ford Community & Performing Arts Center, 15801 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; fot.org.

 

Turkey Trot

Last year, the Turkey Trot and its two offshoots (the Stuffing Strut and Mashed Potato Mile) combined for the largest race in the state. Now celebrating its 30th anniversary, this year’s run promises to be even bigger. 7-9 a.m. Nov. 22.

Woodward Avenue, downtown Detroit; theparade.org.

 

America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

9:05 a.m. Nov. 22. Begins at Mack and Woodward and ends at Woodward and Congress.

Downtown Detroit; theparade.org.

 

Meadow Brook Hall Holiday Walk

The 41st annual Holiday Walk showcases the 110-room Tudor Revival mansion bedecked in holiday finery. Nov. 23-Dec. 22.

Open daily 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Special evening hours Dec. 17-20, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. $20 adult, $12 Oakland University staff and alumni (with I.D.), $5 O-U students (with I.D.), $5 children 17/under with paying adult, free for children 2/under. Seniors receive $5 off Tue. through Thur.

2200 N. Squirrel Rd., Rochester; meadowbrookhall.org/visit/holidaywalk.

 

National Circus of the People’s Republic of China

Founded in 1953 and sponsored by the People’s Republic of China, the “Cirque Chinois” is one of the longest-running National Circus troupes of the communist country. Acts include trapeze artists, contortionists, jugglers, and other feats of daring. Nov. 24-25. $27-$47.

Music Hall Center for the Performing Arts, 350 Madison, Detroit; 313-887-8500.

 

Christmas with the Rat Pack

Travel through time to the glitzy Las Vegas of the ’50s and ’60s as Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. bring down the house with Christmas classics, complete with big band accompaniment. Nov. 27-Dec. 2. $25-$75.

Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-983-6000.
 


Film

 

 

Detroit Film Theatre

The Twilight of the Tsars series highlights two films by Evgeni Bauer. A young woman goes from being an indigent, innocent seamstress into a monster of depravity in A Child of the Big City, as her once-idealistic admirer deteriorates. In Daydream, a mourning husband’s blossoming friendship with a young actress suffers severe tension when the actress’ striking resemblance to his deceased wife causes an obsession. Nov. 1.

• A one-man life force transforms the city he loves through his art in Bel Borba Aqui. Bel Borba breathes new life into Salvador, Brazil, through various forms of public art. Nov. 2-4.

The Story of Film continues with parts nine and 10. The maturation of American cinema in the late ’60s and ’70s is examined, along with satire of the time as well as the birth of black American cinema. Nov. 3. 

• The DFT presents a series of short films to celebrate the opening of this year’s Windsor International Film Festival. The series will include live action and animated work from Canadian and American filmmakers. Viewers will then have the opportunity to vote for their favorites. Nov. 7.

Twilight of the Tsars continues with Iakov Protazanov. The Departure of a Great Old Man combines a dramatized account of Leo Tolstoy’s life with documentary footage. The Queen of Spades, an adaptation of the Pushkin short story, tells the story of a young man who courts the daughter of a countess hoping to discover the countess’ secrets to gambling. Nov. 8.

• The life of writer W.G. Sebald is examined in Patience (After Sebald) Nov. 9.

• The documentary Marina Abramovic: The Artist is Present follows the artist as she prepares a retrospective for the New York Museum of Modern Art. Nov. 9 and 11.

• Parts 11 and 12 in The Story of Film series examine why Star Wars, Jaws and The Exorcist are responsible for the multiplex. Quite possibly the world’s most famous movie star, Amitabh Bachchan, also shows how Bollywood invented a new cinema in the ’70s. Nov. 10.

• Christopher Plummer stars as Prospero in the Stratford Festival’s production of The Tempest. Nov. 11.

• Evgeni Bauer’s work is once again highlighted in A Life for a Life, the story of a self-indulgent prince who falls in love with an adopted woman but marries her wealthier sister. Nov. 15.

The British Arrows, the top collection of British Television Advertising Award winners, showcases their achievements during a limited tour of museums in the United States. Nov. 16-18.

• Cinema in the ’90s is examined in parts 13, 14, and 15 of The Story of Film. The series ends with a glimpse into the future of filmmaking. Nov. 17.

• A guru from the East travels to America to spread his teachings in Kumare. Nov. 23-Dec. 2.

• Dustin Hoffman stars as Benjamin Braddock, a recent college graduate who is seduced by a woman old enough to be his mother, in DFT 101: The Graduate. Nov. 24. $5.

• A mother and daughter fall for the same man in For Luck, another film by Evgeni Bauer that ties themes of unrest and societal views with romance. Nov. 29.

• A private security firm is hired to patrol a small street in Recife, Brazil, following a series of petty thefts in Neighboring Sounds. Nov. 30-Dec. 2.

Tickets for DIA members $7.50, students $6.50, non-members $7.50, seniors $6.50.

In the auditorium at the Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-4005; dia.org/detroitfilmtheatre/14/DFT.

 

Redford Theatre

• Three friends travel to Paris to find work following World War II in An American In Paris. Complications arise when two of the friends fall in love with the same woman. Gene Kelly stars in the musical as an aspiring painter. Nov. 2. $4

• A mother and wife struggles to cope while her husband serves in World War II in Since You Went Away, starring Claudette Colbert and Shirley Temple and a musical score by Max Steiner. Nov. 16-18. $4

• All Ralphie wants is a Red Rider BB gun for Christmas, but he has a hard time convincing his parents, teachers and Santa that this is a proper gift in A Christmas Story. Nov. 30. $4.

17360 Lahser, Detroit; 313-537-2560; redfordtheatre.com.
 

Museums

 

 

Arab American National Museum

Arab Civilization: Our Heritage features Arab contributions to the early world. Ongoing in the Community Courtyard.

Coming to America focuses on Arab immigrants and the culture they brought to the United States. Ongoing in Gallery 1.

Living in America exhibits early Arab-American life. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 2.

Making an Impact celebrates the stories of Arab-American athletes, organizations, physicians, labor leaders, and entertainers. Ongoing exhibit in Gallery 3. $6 adults; $3 students and seniors. Children under 5 free.

13624 Michigan Ave., Dearborn; 313-582-2266; arabamericanmuseum.org.

 

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

• A collective sculptural show, Visions of Our 44th President, recognizes the historical significance of the first African-American U.S. president. Each artist interprets the event through a life-size, three-dimensional form.

Stories in Stained Glass: The Art of Samuel A. Hodge, a series of colorful works focusing on three areas of African-American culture and history: musicians, dancers, and freedom advocates, is one of the ongoing exhibits in the Main Level Corridor.

A Is for Africa includes 26 interactive stations making up a 3-D “dictionary” designed for children. Ongoing in the Lower Level Corridor.

And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture is an evolving exhibit that recounts the 3.5-million-year-old odyssey that began in Africa and ends in Detroit. Ongoing in the Core Exhibition Gallery.

Ring of Genealogy, a work designed by local artist Hubert Massey, depicts the struggles of African-Americans in the United States.

315 E. Warren Ave., Detroit; 313-494-5800; chwmuseum.org.

 

Detroit Historical Museum

After being closed since May for renovations, the museum will reopen Nov. 23 with improvements to Streets of Old Detroit, America’s Motor City, and Frontiers to Factories. New permanent exhibits will also be featured. Doorway to Freedom: Detroit & the Underground Railroad tells Detroit’s story as the “doorway to freedom” in fugitive slaves’ quest to find freedom in the North.

The Allesee Gallery of Culture highlights the people, places, and events that influence our understanding of modern Detroit.

• Detroit played a vital role in the Second World War. Detroit: Arsenal of Democracy is an exhibit that documents the contributions Detroit’s industry made in World War II and also explores how the war changed the city.

• Robert Scherer and Henry Ford are just a few inventors featured in The Gallery of Innovation. This exhibit features the innovators of Detroit and the products they created that we still use today.

5401 Woodward, Detroit; 313-833-1805, detroithistorical.org.

 

Dossin Great Lakes Museum

Bells and Whistles, Flags and Flashes: Lost Languages of the Lakes explores methods used by mariners over the years to communicate with others at sea, and people on shore.

City on the Straits provides snapshots of the ways the Great Lakes and the Detroit River have influenced the region.

Gothic Room allows visitors to experience the likes of a gentlemen’s lounge inside the City of Detroit III. The exhibit also features a window on the right side of the gallery to show the Detroit shoreline in the early 1900s.

S.S. William Clay Ford Pilot House is a Great Lakes freighter that was scrapped, but its pilot house was brought to the museum. Built in 1952, the 646-foot straight-decked vessel was lengthened to 767 feet in 1979.

To Scale: Great Lakes Model Ship Builders features the art of model shipbuilding of Great Lakes vessels in Michigan.

100 Strand, Belle Isle, Detroit; 313-833-1805; detroithistorical.org/main/dossin.

 

Exhibit Museum of Natural History

Evolution & Health studies how the evolution of humans promoted our survival, but not our well-being.

Archeology! Current Research in the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology is an ongoing research exhibit that examines the questions that contemporary archeologists ask about the past and the techniques they use to answer them.

The invisible World of Mites highlights the microscopic insects, and the research Professor Barry O'Connor has done on them. Through mid-November.

• Permanent exhibits are The Hall of Evolution, The Michigan Wildlife Gallery, The Anthropology Displays, and The Geology Displays. Free admission; suggested donation is $6.

University of Michigan, 1109 Geddes, Ann Arbor; 734-764-0478; lsa.umich.edu/exhibitmuseum.

 

Greenfield Village

• Visit nearly 100 historical buildings, including the home of Henry Ford, the replica of the first factory where Ford worked, and the lab where Thomas Edison created the first light bulb. Districts and buildings include: Edison at Work, Henry Ford’s Model T, Liberty Craftworks, Main Street, Porches and Parlor, Railroad Junction, Working Farms. Open daily. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $24 adults; $22 seniors; $17.50 youth. Free for children 4 and under.

20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001; hfmgv.org/village.

 

Henry Ford Museum

Driving America is an exhibit that includes more than 100 vehicles, authentic artifacts, digital media, interactive play and personal accounts that focus on the influence the automobile has had on American culture.

Heroes of the Sky is a permanent exhibit focusing on adventures in early aviation.

With Liberty and Justice for All highlights four pivotal periods of history, beginning with the American Revolution and ending in the 1960s. Permanent exhibit.

Automobiles in American Life and Society features automotive milestones, including the 15-millionth Model T, as well as the Ford Mustang. Permanent exhibit.  Also: Dymaxion House, Presidential Limousines, Made in America, and Rosa Parks Bus.

20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001; thehenryford.org.

 

Holocaust Memorial Center

Exhibits are dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust. Learn about World War II, the Jewish culture, religious beliefs, the postwar world, heroic rescues, and more. The center also houses a multi-lingual library.  $5-$8 admission.

28123 Orchard Lake Rd., Farmington Hills; 248-553-2400; holocaustcenter.org.
 


Music

 

 

Justin Townes Earle

Nothing’s gonna change the way we feel about him now. The folk and country/western singer and son of Texas songwriter Steve Earle has proved that it’s a long journey to success, but a great one. After kicking a drug habit and accepting an Americana Music Award, Earle is five albums into his career as an indie/folk favorite. 8 p.m. Nov. 2. $20.

The Majestic, 4120 Woodward, Detroit; 313-883-9700.

 

Rodriguez

Born Sixto Diaz Rodriguez in Detroit, folk musician Rodriguez has had a spotty but lasting career in the underground and abroad. Gaining recent popularity with an independent documentary, Searching for Sugar Man, which chronicles the investigation into his rumored death, Rodriguez has experienced a career resurgence. 8 p.m. Nov. 2. $15.

The Crofoot, 1 S. Saginaw, Pontiac; 248-858-9333.

 

Ian Anderson

Celebrating his 44th year as a world-renowned singer and flutist, this Scottish musician and Jethro Tull bandleader is taking the stage yet again. His talents don’t end with the flute, though. Anderson is well-versed in guitar, bass, and harmonica, along with a variety of whistling techniques. He has toured the world for more than four decades, bringing with him a unique sound through his signature rock/flute hybrid that is sure to whet your whistle. 8 p.m. Nov. 3. $54-$72.

Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-471-3200.

 

Vince Gill

This country crooner has had the hearts (and ears) of millions for more than three decades through his authentic interpretation of the human experience. After a few successful but brief stints with several bands in the late ’70s and early ’80s, Gill ventured out on his own, signing with RCA Records in 1983. Known for hits like “When I Call Your Name” and “Go Rest High on That Mountain,” Gill has earned 18 CMA Awards and 27 Grammys — the most of any male country artist. 9 p.m. Nov. 3. $35-$94.

The Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, 377 Riverside Dr. E., Windsor; 800-991-7777.

 

John Legend

Learning piano at the young age of 4, Legend, born John Roger Stephens, quickly became a force to be reckoned with on the R & B scene, having won nine Grammys to date. His smooth voice and graceful tickling of the ivories has garnered the attention of, and subsequent collaborations with, such artists as Kayne West, Alicia Keys, Lauryn Hill, and Jay-Z. Wake up and get lifted once again with this stylish crooner. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 4.  $55-$470.

Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-471-3200.

 

Shawn Mullins

In 1998, this singer/songwriter scored big with “Lullaby,” the Atlanta-based musician’s biggest hit to date. Mullins has forged on since that top 10 smash, with his most recent work, 2010’s Light You Up. Marrying acoustic, folk rock, and alternative, Mullins has had a string of minor hits, including “All In My Head,” featured on Scrubs, as well as “Shimmer,” showcased on the Dawson’s Creek soundtrack. This songster has been in business for more than 20 years, lulling fans with his lyrics and mesmerizing melodies. 8 p.m. Nov. 5. $20.

The Ark, 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-1800.

 

Bettye LaVette

Singing soul and R & B for more than 50 years, LaVette has a “voice as powerful as Etta James and a story as compelling as Tina Turner,” Rolling Stone says.  A native of Michigan — born in Muskegon and brought up in Detroit — her first single, “My Man — He’s a Loving Man,” reached No. 7 on the R & B chart in the fall of 1962, when she was just 16. True fame eluded LaVette until her 2005 album, I’ve Got My Own Hell to Raise, named for a line from the Fiona Apple tune “Sleep to Dream.” The album consisted entirely of cover songs written by women, and received a wealth of critical praise. 8 p.m. Nov. 7. $27.50.

The Ark, 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-1800.

 

Madonna

The material girl, the ambitious blonde, the virgin; we all know this native Michiganian, who has blazed pop charts, music videos, and concerts for almost 30 years. 8 p.m. Nov. 8. $49-$941.

Joe Louis Arena, 600 Civic Center Dr., Detroit; 313-396-7000.

 

Carrie Underwood

Finding success in 2005 as the winner of American Idol, country songbird Underwood is one of the most successful alumni of the popular reality TV show. With the crossover hit “Before He Cheats,” suggesting a career in pop, the talented musician stayed the course of country, pleasing fans and record execs alike with 12 No. 1 singles. Calling all cowboy Casanovas and all-American girls, this country queen is coming to claim her throne. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 10. $46+.

The Palace of Auburn Hills, 6 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 248-377-0100.

 

Aimee Mann

This lyrically inclined and multi-talented musician has been getting to the root of the human psyche since 1982. A songwriter at heart, this Virginian battled record companies endlessly until branching out on her own in 1999 with the development of her own record company. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 10. $39.50-$49.50.

Royal Oak Music Theatre, 318 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-399-2980.

 

Bob Dylan

With regard to legends — living or dead — few would disagree with naming Bob Dylan as one. Having been the unelected voice of a nation during the tumultuous 1960s, his music influenced the world and spoke to a generation. Dylan continues on in a way that almost no other solo artist has. Time TBA. Nov. 13. $62-$675.

The Palace of Auburn Hills, 6 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 248-377-0100.

 

Lonestar

Baby, we’re amazed that 2012 marks the 20-year anniversary for the country group, known by pop fans mainly for crossover hits, “Amazed” and “I’m Already There.” After a five-year break to focus on his solo career, lead singer Richie McDonald returns to the group. “We are better together than we ever were apart,” McDonald explains. All four members grew up from humble beginnings in their namesake state, contributing to the band’s hometown feel and longevity. 8 p.m. Nov. 17. $25-$69.

Andiamo Celebrity Showroom, 7096 E. 14 Mile Rd., Warren; 586-268-3224.

 

Carolina Chocolate Drops

Forming in 2005, this traditional folk trio-turned-quintet serves up more than just cornbread and butterbeans. The North Carolina-based group snagged the 2010 Best Traditional Folk Album Grammy for Genuine Negro Jig, and has since opened for the likes of Bob Dylan and Taj Mahal. Each member brings a unique sound and various musical talents through the use of banjo, guitar, jug, harmonica, kazoo, snare drum, fiddle, tambourine, cello, and others. Don’t miss the chance to “boodle-de-bum-bum” right along with them. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 18. $50-$500.

The Ark, 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor; 734-761-1800.

 

Justin Bieber

Love him or hate him, this Canadian heartthrob’s legions of adoring fans are plentiful enough to see him through. With a true musical ability, a string of catchy pop tunes, a recognizable crop of sandy brown hair, and a net worth in the nine figures, this 18-year-old isn’t going anywhere. If you just need somebody to love, check out the Biebs at 7 p.m. Nov. 21. $50+.

The Palace of Auburn Hills, 6 Championship Dr., Auburn Hills; 248-377-0100.

 

Chris Isaak

 After an impressive 25-year career, musician and actor Isaak has released the album that he has “always wanted to make.” Beyond the Sun, a compilation of cover songs by classic American rock ’n’ rollers — Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Johnny Cash, to name a few — offers Isaak’s take on some famous tunes. Moving his band to Sun Studio in Memphis, the collection pays homage to Sam Phillips, trailblazer and begetter of the artists in the assortment. 7:30 p.m. Nov. 23. $49-$245.

Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-471-3200.

 

Uncle Kracker

A recent crossover artist into the world of country, singer/songwriter Uncle Kracker broke onto the scene in 2001 with his first album, Double Wide, featuring the hit “Follow Me.” Teaming up with Kenny Chesney, the pair pulled down the No. 1 sensation, “When the Sun Goes Down,” in 2004. A longtime friend of Detroit-based artist Kid Rock, Uncle Kracker collaborated on such hits as “Cowboy,” “Only God Knows Why,” and “All Summer Long.” 7 p.m. Nov. 23. $9.95 in advance. $15 day of show.

Royal Oak Music Theater, 318 W. Fourth St., Royal Oak; 248-399-2980.

 

Brain Setzer Orchestra

Formed in 1990, this swing band was one of the bigger successes during the swing revival of the mid- to late-’90s, scoring their biggest hit with a cover of Louis Prima’s “Jump Jive an’ Wail” on their 1998 album, The Dirty Boogie. Two albums worth of Christmas music in the early 2000s generated several tours, the most recent of which is “Christmas Rocks!” Don’t miss the chance to dig that crazy Santa Claus. 9 p.m. Nov. 24. $25-$82.

The Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, 377 Riverside Dr. E., Windsor; 800-991-7777.

 

The Who

The 2012 tour of these veteran British rockers could be the last. As Rolling Stone put it: “Along with The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, The Who complete the holy trinity of British rock.” Who are they? Come see at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 24. $50-$282.

Joe Louis Arena, 600 Civic Center Dr., Detroit; 313-396-7000.

 

Leonard Cohen

Carrying the same weight as the likes of Bob Dylan, Canadian singer/songwriter, novelist, and poet Leonard Cohen has been a bona-fide icon for nearly 45 years. The release of his 2012 album, Old Ideas, signifies his continuing talent and everlasting influence. As Music OMH put it: “He has now made a late masterpiece.” 8 p.m. Nov. 26. $74-$800.

Fox Theatre, 2211 Woodward, Detroit; 313-471-3200.

 

Chaka Khan

This “Queen of Funk” singer/songwriter reigned supreme in the 1970s as the lead talent for the band Rufus. Winning 10 Grammys along the way, this Everywoman just might tell you something good if she feels for you. Khan is going to be caught in the act at 8 p.m. Nov. 29. $50-$80.

Sound Board at MotorCity Casino Hotel, 2901 Grand River, Detroit; 313-237-7711.
 


Theater

 

 

Eastern Michigan University Theatre

The holidays can be a difficult time. Some choose to ignore the season, while others set out to spread joy and cheer. The musical staged reading Striking 12 tells what happens when these two worlds collide, intertwining modern-day New York City and 19th-century Denmark. Nov. 9-11. $7-$15.

103 Quirk St., Ypsilanti; 734-487-1220; emich.edu/emutheatre.

 

Fisher Theatre

American Idol finalist and Tony Award nominee Constantine Maroulis and R & B star Deborah Cox give new life to Robert Louis Stevenson’s tale of a man who embodies both good and evil, Jekyll and Hyde. The production features all the songs from the original, reinterpreted to fit the new cast. “This Is the Moment” to see the musical. Nov. 27-Dec. 2. $50-$122.

3011 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-872-1000; ticketmaster.com, BroadwayInDetroit.com.

 

Hilberry Theatre

Constance Ledbelly, a young English literature professor, imagines more comedic endings for Shakespeare’s tragic love stories Romeo and Juliet and Othello in Goodnight Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet). In a quest to prove her theory, she is thrown into her subconscious mind and the two Shakespearean plays to find the lost fool. She also finds the truth about herself, with the help of Desdemona and Juliet. Nov. 16-Feb. 9, 2013. $20-$30.

4743 Cass, Detroit; 313-577-2972; hilberry.com.

 

National Theatre Live

Regarded as one of Shakespeare’s more strange and obscure fables, Timon of Athens tells the story of an ostentatious man who wastes his wealth on those around him, only to find himself abandoned when he outspends his fortune. When Timon later stumbles upon an underground trove of gold, he plots revenge on the city that betrayed him. This hi-def broadcast from London is presented by the University Musical Society. 7 p.m. Nov. 28. $18-$22.

Michigan Theatre, 603 E. Liberty, Ann Arbor; 734-764-2538; ums.org.

 

Performance Network Theatre

Desiree Armfeldt is an enchanting Swedish actress confronted by her past in Stephen Sondheim’s musical A Little Night Music. When she runs into her former lover, Fredrik — and his young wife — the two rekindle their affair during a weekend gathering of friends. Nov. 15–Dec. 30. $32-$39.

120 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor; 734-663-0681; performancenetwork.org.

 

Tipping Point Theatre

Four stories of New Yorkers on a search to find their futures are interwoven in Ordinary Days. Warren is an aspiring artist and professional cat-sitter who befriends Deb, a stressed-out graduate student. Jason and Claire navigate rough terrain as the couple debate moving in together. Although the four never meet, they alter one another’s lives in the musical centered in New York City. Nov. 1–Dec. 9. $29-$32.

361 E. Cady St., Northville; 248-347-0003; tippingpointtheatre.com.

 

Send information at least nine weeks in advance to: Listings, Hour Detroit, 117 W. Third St., Royal Oak, MI 48067. By e-mail: editorial@hourdetroit.
 By fax: 248-691-4531.  

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