Book: 'The Glory Years of the Detroit Tigers: 1920-1950'

The Roaring '20s, '30s & '40s


Published:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the last home game of the Detroit Tigers’ regular season coming late this month, fans of the Old English ‘D’ are already beginning to feel the approaching baseball void. Lovers of the great American pastime might take a cue from gardeners, who comfort themselves with seed catalogues during the fallow months. The sporting version of that solution could well be the baseball tome The Glory Years of The Detroit Tigers: 1920-1950, by William M. Anderson (Wayne State University Press, $39.95).

In addition to its authoritative historical narrative (Anderson is the retired founding director of the Michigan Department of History, Arts, and Libraries), the book is enlivened by 300 images. Even fans with only a passing knowledge of the sport will enjoy the vintage photographs of the stadium, players, and surrounding city. Included are street scenes depicting celebrations of the city’s first World Series championship in 1935, fans at Detroit’s Union Station awaiting the return of the victors in 1945, an aerial panorama of Briggs Stadium and the downtown skyline, and a July 4, 1940, image of 57,633 spectators cramming the old ballpark for a holiday doubleheader.

Familiar faces and names from the home team and around the league abound in the 480 pages of archival-depth information. Even at that considerable length, Bengals fans may express the kind of hope that accompanies every baseball season and wonder when they’ll see a sequel detailing the glory years of 1968 and 1984.

ABOVE: (Clockwise from top left) Lou Gehrig, left, and Tiger rookie Barney McCosky, 1939. Outside Briggs Stadium during the 1945 World Series. An aerial view of Navin Field, 1935. Ty Tyson broadcasting the first Tiger game on WWJ radio. A celebration on Griswold after the Tigers won their first World Series, 1935.
Edit Module
Edit Module Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »Related Content

The Way It Was - The David Whitney Building

Unlikely Sprinter

Cass Tech/U-M graduate Eddie ‘The Midnight Express’ Tolan ran to fame in the 1932 Olympic games.

Read All About It

Detroit Public Library looks back at milestones, and forward into the digital age

The Beat Goes On

Oak Park independent bookstore owners have been keeping the literary faith for more than 30 years

The Way It Was

Edit Module
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Most Popular

  1. A League of Extraordinary Gentlemen
    We asked some far-from-regular guys from metro Detroit to guest star as models for our fashion...
  2. Coming Home
    John Varvatos has opened high-profile boutiques from LA to London, but perhaps no location means...
  3. 2015 Restaurant of the Year
    Torino chef Garrett Lipar’s tasting menus take guests on expertly paced and emotional culinary...
  4. Dining Like Diego
    Local Mexican chefs to take on Frida Kahlo’s recipes as side dish to DIA and MOT events
  5. 2015 Winter Beer Festival Recap
    The cold presented some challenges, but the breweries rose to the occasion
  6. Solid Gold
    Pawn shop turned farmstead-cuisine restaurant feels like home sweet home
  7. Sharing a Passion
    2014 Hatch Detroit winner Sister Pie is all about baking and community building — and taking...
  8. Rochester Tap Room Opens Its Doors
    Serving up 60 Taps with a focus on Michigan beer
  9. Beer (Cheese) Me
    Brown Iron Brewhouse’s Deni Smiljanovski combines two things he loves in this easy,...
  10. Batch Brewing Company Launches Their ‘Feelgood Tap’ Charity Initiative
    Giving back to the community is important to Founder and Head Brewer Stephen Roginson