Henry Ford's Art Garland Parlor Stove a Symbol of Detroit History

The city was considered ‘the Stove Capital of the World’ in late 19th century
1986

Contrary to popular belief, Detroit’s manufacturing base hasn’t always revolved around the auto industry. Using iron ore shipped from the Upper Peninsula, the city of Detroit was considered the “Stove Capital of the World” in the late 19th century with local companies, such as the Detroit Stove Works, Peninsular Stove Co., and Michigan Stove Co., receiving international recognition. The Art Garland Parlor Stove was one of the fanciest models made by Michigan Stove Co. Much as its name implies, the stove, which was created around 1890 from cast iron, nickel, and mica, was sophisticated enough to be featured in the best room of the house. Adorned in elaborate ornamentation, the 6-foot-tall piece, which was likely owned by a wealthy family, was used to not only heat the home, but also to make a beautiful statement that could stand the test of time.  


The Art Garland Parlor Stove is from the collections of The Henry Ford; 20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001.

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