Contributors: September 2008

Jenny RisherJenny Risher

A Michigan native and College for Creative Studies graduate turned New Yorker, Risher came home to photograph this issue’s fall fashion feature (page 98). Her work appears frequently in the pages of Hour Detroit. “The shoot was wardrobe-inspiring,” Risher says. “I want to replace my entire closet with black-and-white clothing.” Her freelance work gives her plenty of opportunity to admire high style. Risher’s clients include Elle Accessories, Kenneth Cole, Marie Clarie, Redbook and Martha Stewart Living.

Justin Maconochie

Justin Maconochie

A Ferndale-based freelance photographer, Maconochie photographed this issue’s feature on the makeover of a mid-century Colonial (page 110). “After surviving my own home improvement last summer, I know remodeling is a real project,” he says. “This makeover was seamless and took cues from the surrounding neighborhood to create a well-designed house.” For this issue, Maconochie also headed to the cider mill to take pictures of doughnuts (page 61). His work has been featured in Vanity Fair and on the cover of Interior Design magazine. His architectural photo essay, which appeared in Hour Detroit last October, won a gold medal at the 2008 City and Regional Magazine Awards.

Taryn Bickley

Taryn Bickley

Bickley’s interest in fashion was cinched when her grandmother offered her free rein over her collection of vintage clothing and accessories. Wearing taffeta dresses and knockoff Zsa Zsa Gabor originals (there’s a baby-doll version that Bickley still wears today) helped cultivate her interest in layering expected combinations with unexpected elements, as she does in her styling on page 98. “I loved the idea of mingling a black-and-white scheme with strong shapes and patterns. It’s so much more challenging in terms of being lively, unique, and modern.” A stylist and writer based in Detroit and Chicago, Bickley’s work has appeared in Chicago Magazine, Detroit Home, Metro Detroit Bride, Chicago Home, Elle Décor, and Luxe Chicago Magazine.

James E. Held

Held’s fascination with the Great Lakes began before the days of widespread air conditioning, when the family went to the shoreline to escape the Midwestern heat. Later on, ships carrying Mesabi Range ore provided him with a livelihood until the decline of the Great Lakes fleet forced him to sail the oceans. “I remember being surprised on my first coastal tanker when I found salt clinging to the railings, and the Big Dipper sitting low on the horizon,” he says. When not sailing as a Merchant Marine Officer, Held works as a freelance writer, pursuing Great Lakes lore, legends, history, and particularly the culinary bounty of its water and shoreline. In this issue, he writes about Great Lakes caviar (page 132).

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