Eat Globally, Act Locally

Get the authentic flavor of favorite ethnic foods right in your kitchen with these Michigan-made products.
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Photograph by Joe Vaughn

1: Teta Foods

“Teta” is Lebanese for grandmother, who was Tarek Abouljoud’s inspiration for Teta Foods. This Clinton Township-based business has five products, including shish tawook (chicken kabob) and shawarma marinades, fattoush and tahini dressings, and garlic dip. tetafoods.com

 

2: Thai Feast

Chef and owner Genevieve Vang of Bangkok 96 has been dishing up authentic Thai food in Dearborn for years. In 2011, she and her daughter Caroline branched out with a line of frozen gluten-free Asian meals and later broth powders and a pad Thai seasoning mix. Broth powder flavors include coconut red curry (pictured here), Vietnamese pho, and tom yum. Use the powder as a base to experiment and create your own authentic Asian meal at home. thaifeast.com

 

3: Raita’s Indian Yogurt

While at University of Michigan’s Stephen M. Ross School of Business, Harinee Sampath developed the idea for a savory Indian yogurt business. After graduating, she brought Raita — a health-focused yogurt with an Indian flair — to life. It’s available in three flavors: cucumber with cilantro and mint, spicy carrot with cumin and coriander, and tomato with coriander and cumin. Use it as a dip, condiment, or sauce for grilled meats and fish. raitayogurt.com

 

4: The Brinery Sriracha

Sriracha addicts can warm up to this local, fiery version of the ubiquitous Asian hot sauce. Made with red jalapenos, garlic, cane sugar, water, salt and vinegar, this version has its own spicy flair with a hint of sweetness. thebrinery.com

 

5: Aunt Nee’s Fresh Salsa and Guacamole

Like many of the products featured here, Aunt Nee’s story begins with family. In 2006, the Schwager family was struggling financially and created a salsa mix. “We even used salsa to pay a bill here and there,” according to their website. The family branched out with products such as guacamole – just add avocados, tomatoes, and chips (which they also produce). auntnees.com

 

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